Yinka Shonibare 1

Yinka Shonibare, Gentleman Walking a Tightrope, 2006.
Mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, rope.
89 1/2 x 122 x 45 1/4 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
The Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Endowment Fund for Painting and Sculpture, Rory and Dedee O'Neil Acquisition Fund, The Richard and Alita Rogers Family Foundation, and Museum Acquisition Fund.

John Pearson, Transformations Series

John Pearson, Transformations Series: Regeneration—Continuum: GBxPbl, 2009, acrylic and pencil on board, 30 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum. Purchased with funds from William and Margaret Lipscomb. 

Helen Frankenthaler 1

Helen Frankenthaler, Wisdom, 1969.
Acrylic on canvas.
94 in. x 112 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Gift of the Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Family Collection in honor of Mrs. Galen Roush. 

James Gobel

James Gobel, I’ll Be Your Friend, I’ll Be Your Love, I’ll Be Everything You Need, 2009
Felt, yarn, acrylic and rhinestones on canvas
72 in. x 56 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Purchased with funds from the Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation, Steven P. Schmidt and Richard J. Krochka, and Museum Acquisition Fund 

Frank Stella

Frank Stella, Diepholz, 1981
Enamel, acrylic, oil and metal flakes on aluminum
114 in. x 128 in. x 28 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Purchased, by exchange, with funds from the John Lyon Collyer Fund and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Memorial Foundation. 

John Sokol 1

John Sokol, Man Eating Trees, 1989.
Tar and varnish on canvas.
72 in. x 96 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Gift of the artist. 

Richard Deacon 1

Richard Deacon, Cover, 1990.
Medium density fiberboard, wood and copper.
72 in. x 132 in. x 48 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Museum Acquisition Fund and The Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Endowment Fund for Painting and Sculpture. 

Scott Miller 1

Scott Miller, Untitled, 1989.
Oil on canvas.
63 x 63 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Gift of the Shirley H. Miller Trust. 

Chuck Close 1

Chuck Close, Linda, 1975-1976.
Acrylic and graphite on gessoed linen.
108 in. x 84 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum.
Purchased with funds from an anonymous contribution, an anonymous contribution in honor of Ruth C. Roush, and the Museum Acquisition Fund. 

Philip Guston

Philip Guston, Opened Box, 1977, oil on canvas, 67 1/4 x 110 1/4 in. Collection of the Akron Art Museum. Purchased, by exchange, with funds raised by the Masked Ball 1955-1963.

The Museum Collection: Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation Galleries

May 12, 2015 - 2018
Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation Galleries

Sample the treasures of the Akron Art Museum collection currently on view in the Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation Galleries, including an electric array of late twentieth-century Pop art, abstract expressionist, surrealist and post-modern works. 

The explosion of mass media throughout the 20th century—radio, movies, television and the internet–spread American popular culture around the world. The repetition and pervasiveness of commercial imagery in our visual culture has inspired many artists to pay homage to pop icons. “I just paint things I always thought were beautiful, things you see every day,” said Andy Warhol, whose sources range from logos of popular brands to media stills of famous people.

James Gobel’s I’ll Be Your Friend, I’ll Be Your Love, I’ll Be Everything You Need takes its title from a 1980s pop song. Like Andy Warhol’s portrayal of Elvis and Malcah Zeldis’s Rita, Gobel’s performer reflects the enormous power celebrities wield in our cultural imagination.

Yinka Shonibare addresses issues pertaining to race and class in powerful paintings, sculptures, photographs, films and performances.

Shonibare’s figures are typically headless, removing direct reference to their race. Their garments are historic and European in style and made with richly patterned “Dutch wax” textiles. Inspired by Indonesian batiks, these fabrics are manufactured in England and Holland for export to Africa and serve as indicators of African identity. In his unsteady position, Gentleman Walking a Tightrope depicts the challenging balancing act that confronts the subject. The sculpture’s references to the West’s impact on Africa and the precariousness of identity are signature themes for Shonibare.

Some of the works in the Haslinger Galleries record or convey physical motion and sensation. Craig Lucas' Broken Arrow delights in color harmony or discord and compositional rhythm and balance. The lightness of the streams of paint in Gene Davis’s canvas gives visual presence to air. Curves and colors seem to weave in and out at dizzying speeds in Frank Stella’s Diepholz.

Organic forms may suggest imagery. Is Richard Deacon’s Cover an organism armored with copper plates or cells gone awry or something else entirely?