Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space showcases recent work by six sculptors for whom working on paper is also an essential part of their practice. Each of the artists’ works in two and three dimensions relate in different ways, although all are distinguished by their mastery of both line and form.  

Anne Lindberg inside green

Anne Lindberg, inside green, 2016, Egyptian cotton thread, staples, Akron Art Museum, Akron Ohio. Photo by Joe Levack/Studio Akron 

Anne Lindberg, folding 04

Anne Lindberg, folding 04, 2016. Graphite and colored pencil on mat board, 24 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist and Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Ocean Voices

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Ocean Voices (floor), 2011-12, cedar and graphite, 53 x 185 x 67 in.; and Norduna (wall), 2011, cedar and graphite, 74 x 92 x 4-1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Lelong New York. Akron Art Museum installation photography by Joe Levack/Studio Akron.

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Untitled 3

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Untitled 3, 2013, pigment, fabric and handmade paper, 33-7/8 x 21-5/8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Lelong, New York. Photography by Jonty Wilde.

Nathalie Miebach, Hurricane Noel Score

Nathalie Miebach, Hurricane Noel, 2010, ink, data, 11 x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist. Photography by the artist.
 

Nathalie Miebach, Hurricane Noel III

Nathalie Miebach, Hurricane Noel III, 2015, reed, wood, rope, data, 18 x 18 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist. Photography by the artist.

Mark Fox, Shallow Field Sluggo

Mark Fox, Shallow Field Sluggo (green and in a void), 2014, oil and acrylic on paper, 50 x 72 in. Courtesy Private Collection. Photography by the artist.

Mark Fox, Confused History of Bad Drawing

Mark Fox, Confused History of Bad Drawing, 2013, acrylic, ink, watercolor, marker, colored pencil and gold leaf on paper with foam and metal saw horse, 108 x 68 x 61 in. Courtesy of the artist. Photography: Joe Levack/Studio Akron.

Judy Pfaff, Turtle

Judy Pfaff, Turtle, 2016, installation view. Courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York. Photo by Joe Levack/Studio Akron

John Newman, Discussion Stick with a Cool Head,

John Newman, Discussion Stick with a Cool Head, 2014, vacuum-formed Plexiglas, cast polyester resin, bronze rod, marble, wood, wood putty, acqua resin, acrylic paint, 18-1/2 x 12-1/2 x 24 in. Louis-Dreyfus Family Collection.

John Newman, Untitled, 2015

John Newman, Untitled, 2015, graphite, colored pencil and chalk on paper, 30 x 22 in. Courtesy of the artist and Tibor de Nagy Gallery. Photography by Kevin Noble.

Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space

October 1, 2016 - January 15, 2017
Karl and Bertl Arnstein Galleries

 

"Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at the Akron Art Museum is the rare type of exhibit that can help knock down some barriers and bring you into current thinking in the visual arts. It’s also fun and truly exciting to wander through; to call it a feast for the eyes is a bit of an understatement."—Anderson Turner, Akron Beacon Journal

"Apart from paper as a sculptural material or a surface on which to draw, the real backbone in the show is [Akron Art Museum Chief Curator Janice Driesbach's] focus on complex, lively and elaborate detailed artworks, including large-scale installations that leave a viewer bowled over."—Steven Litt, The Plain Dealer


Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space showcases recent work by six sculptors for whom working on paper is also an essential part of their practice. Each of the artists’ works in two and three dimensions relate in different ways, although all are distinguished by their mastery of both line and form.

Mark Fox transforms his paintings and drawings into sculpture. The artist hand-corrugates his private drawings—some drawn from transcriptions of Catholic Doctrine—producing sheets of handmade "cardboard." He then cuts this material into sections and assembles sculptures that simultaneously invite reflection and deny access.

Anne Lindberg will create an onsite installation using taut cotton thread to draw lines that create a shimmering mass in space. Extending ideas the artist began exploring in drawings on mat board, scribing thousands of parallel lines using an architect’s bar, her installations are “built with color and air, filament by filament, through space.”

Nathalie Miebach creates drawings in the form of musical scores from data generated by weather events. These in turn inform colorful sculptures the artist weaves from wood, reed and yarn. Miebach prizes weaving for providing a grid to translate phenomena that occur in three dimensions and offering new ways of picturing data.

John Newman makes drawings before, during and after his sculptures, many of them as ways to understand how to realize new ideas. Noted for his eccentric combinations of natural, manufactured, computer-generated and hand-crafted elements in his modestly-scaled sculptures, Newman likewise uses a variety of materials and techniques in his works on paper.

Judy Pfaff, who will also construct an installation in the museum galleries, is a recognized pioneer of installation art. Aptly described as “a collagist in space,” Pfaff embraces a variety of materials and readily marries two- and three-dimensional elements in work distinguished by its dynamism and complexity.

Ursula von Rydingsvard uses graphite, a traditional drawing material, to emphasize the surfaces of her sculptures in cedar and cedar as a medium to create alluring works of paper. In describing her preference for cedar as her material, von Rydingsvard has commented on its lack of visible grain, how it is “neutral; it’s like a piece of paper.”

Works by each of these artists will be on display in dedicated gallery spaces, allowing for understanding of their processes and the diversity of ways they work across media.

Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space is organized by the Akron Art Museum and generously supported in part by the Lehner Family Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council. Special thanks to Hilton Garden Inn – Akron.  

The Lehner Family Foundation     National Endowment For the Arts     The Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation     Ohio Arts Council
             
Hilton Garden Inn -- Akron

Related Links:

[ Kathleen Folkerth, Intersections takes over Akron Art Museum, West Side Leader ] [ Anderson Turner, ‘Intersections’ at Akron Art Museum will expand your horizons, Akron Beacon Journal ] [ Steven Litt, "Akron Art Museum shows create complex, spectacular visual experiences," Cleveland Plain Dealer ]

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