Jimmy Kuehnle, Stuffed Full

Jimmy Kuehnle, Stuffed Full, Kyoto, Japan, 2008, courtesy of the artist.

Jimmy Kuehnle, Stuffed Full (day)

Jimmy Kuehnle, Stuffed Full, Kyoto, Japan, 2008, courtesy of the artist. 

Jimmy Kuehnle, Air to Air Communication

Jimmy Kuehnle, Air to Air Communication, Nagoya, Japan, 2008, courtesy of the artist. 

Jimmy Kuehnle, You Wear What I Wear 1

Jimmy Kuehnle, You Wear What I Wear, inflatable suit, 2009, courtesy of the artist.

Jimmy Kuehnle, You Wear What I Wear 2

Jimmy Kuehnle, You Wear What I Wear, inflatable suit, 2009, courtesy of the artist. 

Jimmy Kuehnle: Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle

October 1, 2016 - February 19, 2017
The Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery

"These abstract forms could read as simply that—shapes, occupying and redefining space with their color, and making no other explanation. But Kuehnle has christened them with names that undercut that cold, modernist perspective."—Michael Gill, CAN Journal

"Work like this makes its own rules and definitions, which is what ultimately art, whether it be visual art, dance, music, film, etc is wonderful for."—Anderson Turner, Akron Beacon Journal

"It’s as though Jimmy Kuehnle took the idea of joy, made a pattern of it, sewed it together, hung it from the ceiling, threw in some air and light, and gave it to us to enjoy. Which, I suppose, is exactly what he did."Dana Norris, Cleveland Scene


Jimmy Kuehnle’s sculptures, created from coated polyester and coated nylon fabric, inflate and deflate, breathing like an organism, sometimes even pulsating with light. “When I work on projects, I always like to learn things and have new experiences. So I set up challenges, situations that require new techniques,” says Kuehnle, who created a new site specific piece that took over the Akron Art Museum’s Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery and extends out into Beatrice Knapp McDowell Grand Lobby, inviting visitors to engage with it. The bright red piece, titled Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle engulfs the gallery, creating a maze that can be explored and even touched.

Humor and a sense of play are key components of Kuehnle’s work, which he creates to react specifically to the spaces they inhabit. Many of his sculptures activate and even gently mock architectural space by cramming bright, flexible shapes of inflated fabric into every nook and cranny. Other works spill out organically from rooms and galleries that are created with right angles and rigid geometry.

Kuehnle who teaches at the Cleveland Institute of Art, has had solo shows at museums, galleries and universities in the United States and internationally. His recent solo exhibition at the Hudson River Museum in New York was reviewed in the New York Times. In 2014 he was selected for the national survey exhibition State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. As a Fulbright Graduate Research Fellow in Japan, 2008, he pursued his interest in public art and sculpture. In 2016 Kuehnle received a Creative Workforce Fellowship. The Fellowship is a program of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture. Funding for the Fellowship program is made possible by the generous support of Cuyahoga County residents through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum and supported by a generous gift from The Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation. Additional support provided by Brouse McDowell, LPA and the Ohio Arts Council.

The Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation     Brouse McDowell, LPA     Ohio Arts Council


 


Related Blog Posts

A Conversation with Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle Artist Jimmy Kuehnle by Alison Caplan, Akron Art Museum Director of Education

Related Links:

[ Dana Norris, "The Pure Joy of Art You Can Touch at the Akron Art Museum, Created By the Cleveland Institute of Art's Jimmy Kuehn ] [ Anderson Turner, "Playful, challenging ‘Wiggle’ takes over a gallery at Akron Art Museum," Akron Beacon Journal ] [ Michael Gill, "Blow Up: Chasing the Push Button Dream with Jimmy Kuehnle," CAN Journal ]