David Vitone

Joe Vitone, David Vitone at his garage filled with possessions of wife, Lisa, who has recently moved out to live with her parents in north Texas, Akron, Ohio, 2013, archival inkjet print, 11 x 14 in., Courtesy of the artist 

Lerrynn Hummel and son

Joe Vitone, Lerrynn Hummel and son, Paul Massey, on patio of her grandmother’s apartment, where temporarily staying, Valleyview Apartments, 31st Street, Barberton, Ohio, 2004, archival inkjet print, 20 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist

Marjorie Angel and Rebecca Barile

Joe Vitone, (l. to r.) Marjorie Angel and Rebecca Barile, mother and daughter with flag at Rebecca’s front door, Akron OH, 2003, archival inkjet print , 20 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist

Grandmother, Sandra Vitone

Joe Vitone, Grandmother, Sandra Vitone; mother, Arathea Booth; and granddaughter, Elizabeth Dunn, with pool and palm tree backdrop, Marshallville OH, 2009, archival inkjet print, 16 x 20 in., Courtesy of the artist

Keith Morlan with son Chuck Morlan

Joe Vitone, Keith Morlan with son Chuck Morlan, Kenmore, Ohio, 2017, archival inkjet print, 20 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist

Arathea Booth

Joe Vitone, Arathea Booth seated on a cooler in yard smoking a cigarette, Marshallville, Ohio, 2008, archival inkjet print , 20 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist

Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27, 2019 - October 27, 2019
Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Gallery

“My intent is the way I’m seeing something significant in them. When I’m photographing the folks around Akron, I very much consider it an homage to them."—Joe Vitone, interviewed by Dan Polletta for WCPN/ideastream

Joe Vitone: Family Records is an ongoing series of portraits of photographer Joe Vitone’s relatives living in and around Akron, Ohio. Begun in 1998, this body of work documents evolving interpersonal connections between parents and children, siblings, spouses, cousins and other relations within working class communities of the Rust Belt region. Shot each summer when the artist—now based in Austin, Texas—travels back to Ohio, this series features scenes from festivities such as birthday parties and weddings as well as intimate portraits set outside homes and workplaces. Touched by celebrations and struggles including marriage, divorce, addiction, new homes, unemployment, new jobs and babies, the lives of Vitone’s relatives reflect experiences common to families across the United States.

Vitone prints his images, which he captures using 8 x 10-inch and 4 x 5-inch view cameras, in both black and white and color. Featuring 55 works photographed in Akron proper, as well as in surrounding communities including Barberton, Stow and Marshallville, Family Records marks the first time a selection from this series has been exhibited in Northeast Ohio.

When you visit

Listen to Joe Vitone telling the stories behind the photographs online: http://bit.ly/AAM_JoeVitoneStories.

More Family Records

Go deeper and view the entire Family Records exhibition, with audio commentary from Joe Vitone on the artist's website.

Joe Vitone: Family Records is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Ohio Arts Council and the Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation.
 

Knight Foundation logo    Ohio Arts Council logo    Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation

Related Links:

[ Dan Polletta, "Photo Exhibit Showcases Akron Native’s ‘Family Records’" WCPN, 90.3, ideastream ]

Art Talk: Joe Vitone

October 24, 2019, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Since 1998, Akron-native Joe Vitone has returned home each year to take photographs for Family Records, an ongoing series of portraits documenting the artist’s relatives living in the area. Vitone will discuss the motivation and process behind this important body of work on the occasion of its first Northeast Ohio showing.

Art Talk: Joe Vitone

October 24, 2019, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Art Talk: Joe Vitone

At the University of Akron Myers School of Art, 150 E. Exchange St., Akron

Since 1998, Akron-native Joe Vitone has returned home each year to take photographs for Family Records, an ongoing series of portraits documenting the artist’s relatives living in the area. Vitone will discuss the motivation and process behind this important body of work on the occasion of its first Northeast Ohio showing.

Free and open to the public

Joe Vitone, (l. to r.) Charlie Morlan and Gabe Booth in combat fatigues with toy guns, Orrville, Ohio, 2006, archival inkjet print, 20 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist