Relief: Mark-Making

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Mark-Making

This week the topic is Mark-Making. Seema and Gina talk about the various kinds of marks they’re making with during this time and how artists use mark-making in their practice.

Deep Dive with Reggie: Elmer Novotny

The Artist and His Wife, Elmer Novotny, (Cleveland, Ohio, 1909–1997, Walnut Creek, California), 1938, Oil on canvas, 52 in. x 44 in. (132.08 cm x 111.76 cm), Purchased in memory of Docent Chair Carol Boyd with funds from the Akron Art Museum docents and gifts in memory of William Bishop and gift of Karen Novotny Tischer, 2010.190

Shop Talk with Maria Alejandra Zanetta

Maria Alejandra Zanetta is an artist and professor living in Akron, OH. Alejandra teaches Hispanic literature, language and culture studies courses at the University of Akron. As an artist, her printmaking and collage work reflect her interest in experimenting with texture and color. Zanetta is also a part of the museum’s Akron Art Library program with her work Vino. Hear Zanetta discuss her love of The Artist and His Wife, using mark-making for texture and movement, and her sweet obsession: chocolate.

Instagram: @maria_alejandra_zanetta_art

Brandt Roberts Gallery, Columbus, OH: http://brandtrobertsgalleries.com

Harris Stanton Gallery, Cleveland, OH: https://www.harrisstantongallery.com

One World Mural Series in Short North: https://shortnorth.org/oneworld/

Akron Art Library: https://www.akronlibrary.org/locations/main-library/culture-av-division/akron-art-library/maria-alejandra-zanetta-vino

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

Relief Podcast is made possible with support from the Ohio Arts Council.

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Research Mysteries from Quarantine: Part 2

By Jeff Katzin, Curatorial Fellow

When I let my mind drift towards broad questions about art, the issues are usually subjective: What makes a work of art beautiful? How can we balance awareness of artistic tradition with a true openness to new ideas? How can artists best communicate truths that are deeply personal? Questions like these are nuanced and exciting, but on occasion it’s a nice change of pace to delve into more objective issues; classic journalistic questions like who, what, when, and where. My last post about Ora Coltman’s Main Street, Cleveland answered a “where” question — Coltman’s scene took place in Cleveland’s Ohio City neighborhood, not on “Main Street,” but rather on Main Avenue. This time around, my research mystery starts with a similarly fundamental question about a work of art: Who?

A dreary sidewalk recedes from the foreground to the left midground in an urban setting. A woman in faded and rumpled layers of clothing sits on the sidewalk in a chair pressed up against the stone barrier behind her. This wall extends along the right side of the sidewalk figures disperse along its edge overlooking the scenery below. Other figures walk either way down the sidewalk in bulky clothing. A line of skinny trees positioned on the outermost region of the street flanks the left side. Their leaves are a burnt orange. Appearing faded in the distance an impressive building erects against the skyline. Its design is elaborate considering the numerous forms that extend from the central structure.Its exterior embellishments indicate a Gothic style.
Bookstalls Along Seine, T. Frank Simon, (1900 — ), c. 1926, Etching and aquatint on paper, 16 in. x 19 1/4 in. (40.64 cm x 48.9 cm), Gift of Mr. H. Austin Hauxhurst, 1958.194

When I was first asked to look into this print titled Bookstalls Along Seine, I figured that there wouldn’t be too many basic questions left to answer. The pictured location is right in the title, and even if that reference to the Seine River, which runs through Paris, wasn’t convincing enough, the famous Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris is clearly visible in the background. As for the artist, he was kind enough to clearly sign and date the print in its lower right margin.

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Signature of “T. F. Simon” with the date “10–12–26”

Even working from home and limited to online resources, I figured it would be easy enough to find out a thing or two about T. Frank Simon, his working methods, and perhaps his relationship to the city of Paris. However, when I ran a Google search for his name, I found just one page about artwork (and lots of pages about an immunologist in Kentucky). Even for an obscure artist, that’s a surprising lack of information. The one relevant result, from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, suggested that Simon might be Czechoslovakian, so I thought I’d try searching for “T. Frank Simon Czechoslovakian artist.”

That’s when things really started rolling. I’ll cut to the chase and share this truly amazing website:

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The homepage at tfsimon.com

It turns out that tfsimon.com pertains not to “T. Frank Simon,” but to a lauded Czech artist named Tavik František Šimon. The website, with a simple visual style but an incredible wealth of information, seems to be a labor of love composed by devoted admirers of his work. Though they certainly deserve it, the authors don’t always take credit, but I did find the names Catharine Bentinck and Eva Buzgova on some pages. Immediately, I became pretty sure that, despite the mixup about his name, Tavik František Šimon was the artist I was looking for. Compare this signature from tfsimon.com to the one from the Akron Art Museum’s print (pictured earlier):

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Examples of Šimon’s signature from tfsimon.com’s page of examples

That’s about as good as a match can be! For even further confirmation, the website includes a catalogue raisonné of Šimon’s career — in other words, a comprehensive listing of every known work that he ever made. It’s fantastic to have such an extensive and detailed resource available online. I looked in the graphics in miniature section and, sure enough, I found a matching image, #430. There it’s labeled as Quai de la Tournelle in Autumn, Paris and dated 1925.

This was already great progress, but I was curious about that 1925 date, since it appears that Šimon himself signed the Akron print a year later, “10–12–26.” Assuming for a moment that he actually made this print the previous year, what was Šimon doing in October of 1926, and why would he have added that date?

Once again, tfsimon.com stood ready with a tremendous level of detail. As it happens, the artist had a particularly eventful 1926, as he embarked upon a trip around the globe at the end of August. Before returning to Europe in February of the following year, Šimon saw Cuba, Japan, China, Singapore, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and more, and even made a number of stops in the United States. In fact, on October 12, 1926, the day that he signed the Akron print, he was in Cleveland, Ohio. Here’s his datebook from the time — like I said, the website provides a tremendous level of detail, if you dig far enough into it:

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Tavik František Šimon’s datebook from October 1926

There are two entries for the 12th in particular. The second of these mentions something about “Bailey Art School,” and I was able to solve that one once I made my Google search sufficiently specific — it seems that Henry Turner Bailey would have been dean of the Cleveland School of Art (now the Cleveland Institute of Art) at the time, so Šimon very likely had a meeting with him. That private conversation probably has less to do with the Akron print than the first entry, which reads “Exhibition in the Union Trust Comp.” To figure that one out, I did some more digging on tfsimon.com and found this wonderful piece of archival material:

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Brochure for Tavik František Šimon’s exhibition in Cleveland, 1926

Coinciding with Šimon’s visit to Cleveland, his friend and supporter William Ganson Rose (a Cleveland-based advertising executive) organized an exhibition of the artist’s works, which was displayed in the downtown lobby of the Union Trust Company. As an aside, Šimon remained friends with Rose for the rest of his life. Not long after the artist passed away, his wife responded to a letter from Rose: “He remembered to his last days the nice journey in 1926 and his kind friends he met on the World trip. On Cleveland and on you Mr. Rose, he had the nicest recollections and spoke often with his family about you.” It’s my guess that Šimon gave the print that eventually made its way into the Akron Art Museum collection to someone at the exhibition that Rose organized, either as a gift or a paid purchase. This idea is supported by what can be found next to the signature and date in the print’s margin:

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Signature and inscription on the Akron Art Museum print

Now I had come to another “Who?” question — who is Katherine Haskell? I had a sense that I had heard that name before in connection with Ohio history, and so I did a bit of searching and quickly realized that there was a Katharine Haskell who is better known as Katharine Wright Haskell, the sister of the Wright brothers, Wilbur and Orville! In addition to serving as a crucial promoter and supporter of her brothers’ efforts in aviation, Katharine graduated from Oberlin College to the west of Cleveland and eventually split her time between Oberlin (where she was a member of the College’s board of trustees) and Dayton, Ohio (where she taught Latin at Steele High School).

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Oberlin College photograph of Katharine Wright, 1898

It would be hard to find out exactly why she might have been in Cleveland on October 12, 1926, but the possibility that the museum’s print might be connected to a world-traveling artist and a historically-significant woman is quite enticing. There are a few pieces of contrary evidence, however. First, as you might have noticed above, Katharine Wright Haskell spelled her first name with an A (Katharine), while Šimon inscribed his print with an E (Katherine). But that could be an honest, minor mistake. Second, Katherine Wright did not marry and officially take the name Haskell until November 20, 1926 — too late, but only by a couple weeks! Maybe she asked Šimon to inscribe the print with her upcoming marriage in mind, and maybe he misspelled her first name. Regardless, it’s hardly certain that I have found the correct recipient of the print.

When various COVID-19-related restrictions are lifted, I look forward to finding a copy of Šimon’s diary entries from his world tour — the published collection was somewhat recently translated from Czech into English. If I’m lucky, I’ll be able to take this enticing connection from suspicion to confirmation. For now, I’ll settle for knowing that the Akron Art Museum’s copy of Bookstalls Along Seine is connected to an impressive voyage around the globe — not too shabby.

Coffee with the Collection is made possible with support from the Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation and the Samuel Reese Willis Foundation.

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Relief: Abstract

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Abstract

This week the topic is Abstract. Seema and Gina talk about how artists use abstraction and artist Alma Thomas’ career.

Deep Dive with Reggie: Alma Thomas

Pond — Spring Awakening, Alma W. Thomas, (Columbus, Georgia, 1891–1978, Washington, D.C.), 1972, Acrylic on canvas, 68 in. x 55 in. (172.72 cm x 139.7 cm), Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David K. Anderson, 1976.32

Shop Talk with Theron Brown

Theron Brown is a multi-faceted musician living in Akron, OH. As a pianist, Theron utilizes his gospel and jazz influences to compose songs under his name and with the Theron Brown Trio. He also ensures a lifelong pursuit in learning and advocating for music through his work as a professor at Kent State University and as the founder of the Rubber City Jazz & Blues Festival. Listen in to hear Theron discuss Alma Thomas, the importance of vulnerability, and what keeps him hopeful and motivated.

https://www.theronbrownmusic.com
Instagram: @theronbrown
Rubber City Jazz & Blues Festival: https://www.opentonemusic.org/rubber-city-jazz-blues-festival

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

Relief Podcast is made possible with support from the Ohio Arts Council.

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Research Mysteries from Quarantine: Part 1

By Jeff Katzin, Curatorial Fellow

COVID-19 has disrupted human life on every level, and museums are no exception. During these strange and difficult times, Akron Art Museum staff have ably adapted to all sorts of new roles while working remotely. One of our highest priorities has been to stay connected with our community, even if social distancing means that we have to lean on our online presence more than our physical galleries. To this end, we’ve rolled out a new website, debuted a podcast, sent out kits for at-home art-making, partnered with other museums to create games and puzzles, and more!

Here are just some of the AAM staff members who have shifted into new roles during the COVID-19 pandemic.

But, with our galleries closed, the pandemic has also given us an occasion to look inward and focus on our collection of artwork in new ways. That’s where I come in, along with my partner in this effort, Katie DiDomenico (Digital Content Creator). We’re slowly working our way through the museum’s holdings, conducting research on individual objects, and writing new labels that will eventually appear on our website. We’re starting with the works of art that are scheduled to come up in other programming so that our colleagues have plenty of background information at their disposal.

Since our work usually happens behind the scenes, I thought it would be fun to share some of it more broadly by highlighting a couple of the more exciting research mysteries that I’ve had a chance to solve.

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Main Street, Cleveland, Ora Coltman, (Shelby, Ohio, 1858–1940, Cleveland, Ohio), c. 1937, Woodcut on paper, 9 in. x 11 in. (22.86 cm x 27.94 cm), Gift of the Art Department, Akron Board of Education, Courtesy of the Fine Arts Program, Public Buildings Service, U.S. General Services Administration Commissioned through the New, Deal art projects, 1948.5

I started looking into this print by Ora Coltman when Seema Rao, our deputy director, emailed Katie and I with a seemingly simple question: “What location is shown in this picture?” I found that exciting right off the bat. Sometimes art research is about fleeting emotions, nebulous ideas, and invisible histories — I love all of those things, and that’s what I usually work on. Still, pinning down some cold hard facts with a bit of detective work can be a great change of pace.

The first thing that struck me about the print was its title: Main Street, Cleveland. Having grown up on Cleveland’s east side, I knew already that there is no “Main Street” in Cleveland. Since the title was no help (and the files that I have electronic access to were no better), I’d have to use the picture itself as a guide. Luckily, it has some distinctive features. First, it’s set on a hill that slopes upward evenly and gently from left to right. Second, it features a church with a distinctive bit of architecture: a square tower with a crenellated top (like a medieval castle wall) and a particular arrangement of windows, located in the middle of a roof that slopes down evenly on both sides. The church is also behind a row of buildings, so it’s on a different street, and one that doesn’t quite seem to be parallel to the main street depicted in this Main Street print. I decided my best bet was to track down a matching church on or near a hill in Cleveland.

Even art historians like me rely on Google all the time, and Google Maps was my first stop. How long can it take to look through all of the churches in Cleveland, I thought? All morning, it turned out. I never realized that there were quite so many until I had to look up all of them and line up a street view of every single one!

After this lengthy search, I had found three decent possibilities, but none of them seemed to match properly.

All three of them had square and centrally-located towers and generally the right sort of slanting roof, but none had the right arrangement of windows or a crenellated top. And, crucially, none of them were anywhere near a hill. At this point I considered giving up and concluding that Coltman had most likely invented parts of his scene without entirely basing it on a real place, but I thought I’d try one more possibility. I once worked for the Cleveland Public Library, and I knew that they have an extensive database of historic photographs that’s pretty easy to search. After typing in “church” and looking through a couple hundred pictures, I hit upon this one.

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St. Malachi Catholic Church on Washington Avenue in Ohio City

St. Malachi Catholic Church has everything! The square-shaped and centrally-located tower, the slanted roof, and the arrangement of windows. It’s even located right near the top of a steadily sloping hill that leads up from the West Bank of the Flats and into Ohio City. And there was one more detail that really sealed it as a match for Coltman’s picture…

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Just north of the church’s location — on an unusual angle that matches Coltman’s print — is a road not named “Main Street,” but rather Main Avenue! St. Malachi, then, even provides an explanation for the seemingly incongruous name of Coltman’s picture — someone must have written it down incorrectly. So, if it’s such a perfect fit, why hadn’t I managed to find this key to my mystery sooner?

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Fire at St. Malachi Catholic Church, 1943

The Cleveland Public Library’s archive of historic photographs managed to provide an answer to this question too: The original St. Malachi Catholic Church was lost in a fire in 1943, less than a decade after Coltman included it in his print. That’s why, when I had come across the current St. Malachi, I didn’t stop to consider it — a new church was built soon after the fire, with a totally different architectural arrangement.

Coltman’s print, then, provides a glimpse of a very different place than the one found in the present day. Just about every building that he depicted seems to be gone — this includes the church, but also the colorful row of houses, which have since been replaced by small industrial and construction workshops. Main Street, Cleveland thus has much to tell us about the past, and it can tell even more now that we know the exact spot that it describes.

Check back July 20th for another intriguing research mystery — the next one involves a case of mistaken identity, an impressive amount of foreign travel, and one of the most amazing art-historical websites that I’ve ever seen!

Coffee with the Collection is made possible with support from the Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation and the Samuel Reese Willis Foundation.

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Relief: Motivation

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Motivation

This week the topic is Motivation. Seema and Gina share some of their thoughts about how motivation looks different during quarantine and how artists get themselves motivated.

Deep Dive with Reggie: Mickalene Thomas

Girlfriends and Lovers, Mickalene Thomas, (Camden, New Jersey, 1971 — ), 2008, Acrylic, enamel and rhinestones on panel, 108 in. x 144 in. (274.32 cm x 365.76 cm), The Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Endowment Fund for Painting and Sculpture, 2010.1

To hear Mickalene Thomas talk about what motivates her, click here.

Shop Talk with Arron Foster

Arron Foster is an artist and educator who works in a variety of media, including printmaking, book arts, video, and installation. Arron has exhibited both nationally and internationally, while also teaching university coursework in print media and book arts. This edition is especially fun since Katelyn had Arron as a professor at Kent State University. Hear Arron discuss Mickalene Thomas’s work, what drives his motivation, and his favorite (and very specific!) salty snack.

Website: https://arron-foster.squarespace.com
Instagram: @fosta1918
Zygote Exhibition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCp1S7V-ujA

Current & Forthcoming Exhibitions:
Virtual Exhibition: And the Band Played On- Failure, Catastrophe, and Absurdity. IN TOTO Gallery

  • 2020 Mid American Print Council Juried Members Exhibition hosted by Kent State University.
  • 2020 Screenprint Biennial- Hosted by Todd Gallery at Middle Tennessee State University.
  • Past Lives Collaborative Book project- published by Risolve Studios- Lancaster PA.
  • Cul-De-Sac Print Exchange (Exhibition)- Gathered Glassblowing- Toledo, OH.

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

Relief Podcast is made possible with support from the Ohio Arts Council.

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Relief: Spring

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Spring

This week the topic is Spring. Seema and Gina share some of their thoughts about how the weather affects artists and their work.

Deep Dive with Reggie

Spring Thunderstorm, Charles Burchfield, (Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio, 1893–1967, Buffalo, New York), 1955, Watercolor and charcoal on paper, 29 7/8 in. x 40 1/8 in. (75.88 cm x 101.92 cm), Gift of Mrs. Mary S. Huhn, Mrs. Dorothy S. Steinberg, and Mr. John F. Seiberling, Jr. in memory of their father, Mr. J. Frederick Seiberling, 1964.11

Shop Talk with Andrea Myers

Image courtesy of Sven Kahns

Andrea Myers is an artist and educator living in NE Ohio. Her work often utilizes painted paper, fabric, scissors, and a sewing machine to create her multi-layered pieces. Even with being a widely exhibited artist, those with a Summit County library card can rent her work through our Akron Art Library program. Hear Myers discusses her relationship with spring, her motivation during these times, as well as the work she is currently creating in her home studio.

https://www.andreamyersartist.com/
Instagram: @andreamyersart
“Neon Speed” solo exhibition: here
“Pieced+Painted” two person exhibition: here

“#fromthestudio” online catalogue and exhibition goes live June 19th: https://www.hammondharkins.com

Image courtesy of Sven Kahns

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

Relief Podcast is made possible with support from the Ohio Arts Council.

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Modern Art for Animal Crossing: New Horizons

by: Maryann Wohlwend

Akron Art Museum collects work from 1850 to the present. The museum has a pioneering history in collecting and exhibiting photography, video, and video games as fine art, purchasing works by women artists with regional reputations & international stature, and by seriously collecting the work of working-class, self-taught artists who express their concerns about contemporary life. Akron Art Museum’s mission is to enrich lives through modern & contemporary art.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons, who isn’t playing? Chances are you’ve found & foraged a wealth of fruit & firewood and developed your cultural tastes by differentiating real vs. fake art. Now it’s time to become connoisseurs of collecting modern & contemporary art for your very own museum. We want to enrich your (gaming) life by introducing AAM artworks that you can download, decorate, & display — no Nook loan required.

We used the Animal Crossing Pattern Tool to turn three of our artworks into scannable QR codes to use in your game. Browse 1000s of images of our collection at https://www.akronartmuseum.org/on-view/, upload them into the Pattern Tool, and generate your own QR codes for customization on your island…miles away from Ohio, the heart of it all.

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Winter Evening, Raphael Gleitsmann, (Dayton, Ohio, 1910–1995, Akron, Ohio), c. 1932, Oil on fiberboard, 39 in. x 44 in. (99.06 cm x 111.76 cm), Gift of Joseph M. Erdelac, 1981.26

This scene of a downtown Akron intersection, bustling with activity on a snowy winter’s evening, captures the feel of the city’s Main Street in the 1930s. Now seen as a glimpse into a vanished past, Winter Evening represents an ambitious young artist’s effort to show the city he knew best. After high school, Gleitsmann studied art with a couple northeast Ohio artists and instructors, but remained essentially self-taught, exploring new ideas and materials on his own.

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Narcisse (Narcissus), Laure Albin Guillot, (Paris, 1879–1962, Nogent-sur-Marne, France), 1934, Fresson print, 13 3/8 in. x 10 1/8 in. (33.97 cm x 25.72 cm), Purchased with funds from Mrs. Beatrice K. McDowell, 1996.11

“Photography,” claimed Laure Albin Guillot, “must be true to life and sincere; it must likewise be beautiful.” Unlike many of her contemporaries, for whom the image as seen through the camera lens was the single important aspect of the work, Albin Guillot regarded the mastery of photographic printing techniques as an integral part of the endeavor. “Few other photographers,” it was said of her, “possess the knowledge and mastery . . . [and] take the same care with the execution of a work . . . as with the taking of the view.”

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Indestructible Object, Man Ray, (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1890–1976, Paris, France), 1923 (1975 edition), Metronome with cardboard, 9 1/4 in. x 4 1/2 in. x 4 1/2 in. (23.5 cm x 11.43 cm x 11.43 cm), Gift of John Coplans, 1979.10

Man Ray, a pioneer of Dada and Surrealism, was the only American artist to play a major role in developing those influential early 20thC movements. In 1923 he produced Indestructible Object which became the most recognized readymades in history. Ready-mades consist of everyday, mass-produced objects that attain status as a work of art through selection, slight alteration, and designation by an artist. Borrowing from the artist’s original title for this work, Akron Art Museum created the exhibit, Objects to be Destroyed (on view February 29, 2020 — August 9, 2020) full of unexpected everyday items as a way to draw attention to the items’ physical and aesthetic characteristics. The artists encourage viewers to reconsider the artistic process as an intellectual rather than a purely technique-driven pursuit.

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We’ve even included our museum logo to pattern your t-shirts, floors, & more.

How to scan QR codes from the Nintendo Switch Online app:
1. Open the app. find Animal Crossing: New Horizons under Game-Specific Services.
2. Find Designs in the Nook Link menu. follow the commands to scan a QR code. after you’ve scanned the design, save it in the app.
3. When you’re back in the game on the Switch, go to Custom Designs on your Nook Phone and hit (+) to download a design. Save it in a blank Design Pattern slot.

You can display your artwork, decorate as wallpaper, walk on it as floor tiles, wear it as clothing, or whatever you wish!

We would love to see how you used our patterns: tag us on social media @akronartmuseum

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from Acme Fresh Market, the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation

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Relief: Care

This weekly podcast brings listeners joy and comfort for these uncertain times.

The Akron Art Museum’s staff shares insights from their own lives combined with conversations about the collection and interviews with regional artists and musicians.

Join us every Tuesday.

Care

This week the topic is Care. Seema and Gina share some of their thoughts about how care has changed in the context of Stay and Home.

Deep Dive with Brian Bress

Click to learn about Brian Bress’s 2019 solo show at the Akron Art Museum, “Brian Bress: Pictures Become You

Learn more about Bress and watch his digital works: http://brianbress.com/ Bress can be found on Instagram @brianbress

Hear from Bress about his process and background:

VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.1
VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.2
VIEW More Brian Bress Pt.3
VIEW More Brian Press Pt. 4

Shop Talk with So Fun Studio

So Fun Studio is Erin Guido and John Paul Costello — a lively collaborative duo living in Ohio City. Together, they create joyful and light-hearted interactive public art and products. Some of which you may have seen around Cleveland and at the Akron Art Museum’s Please Touch! exhibit in 2017. Hear them talk about their love for Brian Bress, how creating is self-care, and their must-have desert island studio needs.

https://www.sofunstudio.com
https://www.eringuido.com
https://johnpaulcostello.myportfolio.com
Instagram: @sofunstudio @egweeds @Jpcform

So Fun Studio mentions:
https://ohpinkpartyshop.com
https://houseparty.com

Relief Podcast Music

Jordan King is a multi-instrumentalist based in Kent, Ohio. Through his music project, Swell Tides, he has worked with Akron Recording Company and Electric Company Records. His work has been featured in the Devil Strip, Cleveland Scene, Akron Recording Company’s Where the Hell is Akron, OH? Vol. 2. Find Swell Tides on Bandcamp and Spotify, and stay in tune with upcoming shows on Instagram @swelltides

https://smelltides.bandcamp.com/

Relief Podcast is made possible with support from the Ohio Arts Council.

https://soundcloud.com/akronartmuseum/relief-podcast-episode-1-brian-bress

Elias Sime: Tightrope

Complex tableaus made with nontraditional materials

Elias Sime: Tightrope, the first major traveling survey dedicated to the Ethiopian artist’s work, is on display at the Akron Art Museum through May 24. Sime’s March 29 artist talk has been canceled as part of public health efforts, but you can take a close look at his large-scale tableaus made of reclaimed electronic components and learn more about the artist’s work in his own words through this virtual tour on all AAM’s social platforms. Enjoy the #MuseumatHome.

Elias Sime: Tightrope is organized by the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York.

Its presentation in Akron is made possible through the generous support of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; Ohio Arts Council; The Tom and Marilyn Merryweather Fund; the Kenneth L. Calhoun Charitable Trust, KeyBank, Trustee; Katie and Mark Smucker; and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Kanfer.

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: (9) While Observing . . . (detail), 2018, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 94 3/8 x 63 3/8 in., Collection of Robert and Karen Duncan, Lincoln, NE. Photo by Mike Crupi.

Each material I collect has its own story. It has its own language. Every story has a beginning. I think about the first person who thought or dreamed of it and all the people who transformed that dream into a material. I also think about the various people who used and reused the material before it landed in my hands. I never worry about how old or new the material is. My art is not about recycling or repurposing material but about expressing my ideas. For instance, when I first saw a motherboard, it reminded me of a city, of landscapes, as well as of the people in the factory who assembled it.
— Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Surface and Shadow 2 (detail), 2016, Reclaimed electronic components and buttons on panel, 9 ft. 5/8 in. x 17 ft. 5/8 in., Pizzuti Collection, Columbus, OH. Photo by Mike Crupi.

I have done a lot of work using clothes buttons. When you wake up in the morning, you open your button or button-up, and you do that with care. It is an expression of love. It puts you in contact with your body… [Buttons] tell the stories of the persons who used them; the human traces they hold are expressions of love. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Silent 1 (detail), 2019, Reclaimed electronic components on panel, 72 1/2 in. x 10 ft. 6 in., Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

It took me a great deal of time to collect the keyboards. Keyboards have evolved very quickly — the ones today use a completely different technology from a couple of decades ago, but their colors are monochromatic, which gives an impression of silence. Sometimes, thoughts are expressed through noise, and other times, through silence. The keyboard is not loud, but it is full of symbols. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: Hands and Feet (detail), 2009–14, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 71 in. x 10 ft. 10 1/4 in., Collection of Nancy and Joseph Chetrit, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

The only thing I think about when I pick the cellular phone motherboard, for instance, is the excitement of the person who owned it the first time they got it. The hope they felt about the future, the eagerness to use it. That, for me, is what love is all about. To realize that we are all connected and that human contact, that touch, is created in every object we take for granted. — Elias Sime

Elias Sime, Tightrope detail, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel
Elias Sime, Tightrope: (8) While Observing . . . (detail), 2018, Reclaimed electronic components and insulated wire on panel, 86 3/4 x 46 5/8 in., Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York. Photo by Mike Crupi.

The materials I select, by the time they get into my hands, they’ve been touched by so many people, and now they’re in my hands. Even though it may not be visible, when you’re working on your personal computer, you leave a part of you on that. Then, when it breaks, there is somebody else who goes inside it and touches it: there’s that fingerprint, that connection that you can even have with the machine. Technology is very tactile. It’s connected to us. That doesn’t mean it’s going to be beneficial for us, 100 percent. It actually made us lose a lot of things, too. It gave us speed. But we have also lost that calmness, tranquility, and quiet. — Elias Sime

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Make a Mini Zine!

#MuseumAtHome #TryThis

Need a quick way to creatively get out your stay-at-home stresses? A new style of sending a message to a friend? A fun approach for adults and kids alike to make a mini-story? Try making a zine!

Zines, short for magazines, are self-published, easy-to-make projects that have zero-to-no stipulations. Zines used to be created as a way for science fiction fans to add onto their favorite narratives, often through cutting and pasting paper together to form a small book or issue. Now, zines can be found as more formal, published material, often produced by a master printer.

Using one piece of standard size paper, make an 8-page zine and get started with your own narrative!

History of Zines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/88911/brief-history-zines

Locations of Zine Libraries across U.S. and world: https://zines.barnard.edu/zine-libraries

Supply List:

8.5×11 inch paper

Scissors

Directions

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Ready?

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Hot dog fold

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Open up fold

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Now, hamburger fold

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Open fold, and turn paper

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Fold bottom half up to the hamburger fold’s crease

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Fold top half to meet bottom half at hamburger fold

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Open up folds

(Can you see the 8 pages?)

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Turn paper, and hamburger fold, again!

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Use scissors to cut along this center crease to the center point

(This cut will allow the paper to fold into a zine)

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Open paper

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Hot dog fold, but prop it up like a tent

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Push the two tent ends into the center

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Fold together 3 of the 4 flaps

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Take that last flap, and fold into the rest of the flaps

(This is your back cover)

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Be sure to crease all the seams well!

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Behold- a tiny, baby zine!

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Bring out all the goods!

Using stickers, stamps, tape or objects to glue in, can help

to alleviate the pressure to draw or write

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Happy zine-ing!

#TryThis is made possible with support from PNC, the Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation, the Alan and Janice Woll Family Fund, OMNOVA Solutions Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M. Richie Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Considine

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