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Crossword June 14

Nothing better than enjoying a puzzle on a summer day. Join The Franklin Institute, Canadian War Museum,Air Force Space & Missile Museum, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, The Royal Saskatchewan Museum, the Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life, the Lynn Museum, Stories of Lynn, the Allentown Art Museum, and the Akron Art Museum.

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To play online. To download a pdf.

Across

4

Colds that last a long time

5

Museums tend to put things on a ___.

7

This future member of the Group of Seven was wounded at the Battle of Mount Sorrel in June 1916 and later served as an official war artist from 1917 to 1919. The Canadian War Museum has more.

8

The ocean around Cape Canaveral became known as “_____-infested waters” during the 1950s due to guidance system issues of this Air Force pilotless bomb tested there. Learn more at the Air Force Space & Missile Museum.

9

Shimmel Zohar, a mythical 19th-century Jewish immigrant, founded Zohar Studios, whose work in THIS MEDIUM created an idiosyncratic vision of Victorian life in the United States. Learn more at the Contemporary Jewish Museum.

10

Which Walter taught at King Edward Seventh School and died in a motorcycle accident on Saturday Market Place in Kings Lynn? Learn more at the Lynn Museum.

13

Common in Historic Houses

15

Natural History collection object

16

Gallery ___

18

Eponymous pictograph that represents Canada’s only known written record of Treaty promises from the viewpoint of the Indigenous people. Learn more at Royal Saskatchewan Museum.

Down

1

Middle school homework or natural history museum regular

2

Not Big, but important, is what you’d call Allentown Art Museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright Library from this family.

3

Often seen atop 1 across

5

Starry Nights during the day

6

What is the name given to a medieval ground (street-level) cellar or storage room, often brick-lined and vaulted, one of which is Stories of Lynn?

11

Line Marker

12

The hippocampus, which plays an important role in long-term memory, is shaped like a ___. Learn more at the Franklin Institute.

14

This painter’s last name means “beautiful.” The Georgia Museum of Art can give you a hint.

17

What flower is on the unusually prominent high hooded canopy over the doorway at Ancient House? Learn more at Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life

18

Group of talking heads or non-art wall hanging

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What’s Your Social Isolation Mood?

Social isolation has brought out so many emotions, often at the same time. Our photography collection might help you track your emotions.

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  1. Dieter Appelt began his career as an opera singer, but then transitioned into photography. He traveled extensively specializing in long exposure photographs and images of slow moments.
  2. Tiny was a prostitute living in Seattle that photographer Mary Ellen Mark captured when on assignment for LIFE Magazine. This image typifies Mark’s unsparing, empathetic style.
  3. Deborah Luster has photographed people in the deep south for much of her career. These portraits, like this one, seem to show an inner sense of the sitter.
  4. American artist Judith Golden often plays with photography, like in this image where a photograph is held by the sitter, only to be photographed for the final composition.
  5. Ralph Eugene Meatyard is best known for his photographs that examine the bizarre and mysterious realms that exist within our everyday world.
  6. Weegee, a freelance press photographer whose lurid photos of crime and accident scenes frequently appeared in tabloid newspapers, often played manipulating compositions like in this photograph.
  7. Prolific photographer Walker Evans’ scenes of everyday life often show people in candid moments.
  8. Margaret Bourke-White had a long career as a documentary photographer, gaining some of her early successes in Cleveland.
  9. Vernon Cheek studied with Harry Callahan before going on to founded the photography department at Perdue.
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Cooking with the Collection: Claes Oldenburg

This regular series uses the Akron Art Museum’s collection as a source for inspiration for meals to cook at home. Links to recipes at the end of the post.

Most visitors to the Akron Art Museum experience Claes Oldenburg’s work. He, with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, were the creators of Inverted Q, the large painted concrete sculpture occupying an honored position at the front door. While the keen observer might pick out the shape of the letter Q on first glance, this large form feels abstract, unlike much of Oldenburg’s oeuvre. His works often transformed everyday objects, playing with scale and texture.

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In Tea Bag from 1967, Oldenburg a ubiquitous everyday item into a relief sculpture. Oldenburg notes often in interviews that his work was about transforming items, unlike Dada-artist Marcel Duchamp, for example, “I wasn’t copying; I was remaking them as my own.” This tea bag is increased in size five-fold, with the overall composition being 39 inches high. The greater transformation might be material. A dripping tea bag on a table, something liquid and easily wiped up, becomes vinyl, screenprint on plexiglass, with felt and rayon cord.

What does a work like this mean? Oldenburg is careful to warn viewers to avoid easy interpretation of his works, “This isn’t to say the work is inflected with nostalgia; rather, it reflects the fact that the object only serves as a starting point.” Oldenburg makes the object part of the gallery space in an unexpected manner. With the change in scale and media, the tea bag becomes immaterial, ceding to forms and colors. Yet, are the actual objects not part of the interpretation? Ohio-born artist and sometime Oldenburg collaborator suggested the artist “was looking at American consumer culture and finding New World romance.” Oldenburg was the child of a Swedish diplomat, who while born abroad, was largely raised in Chicago. He acknowledges the Midwestern city was formative in his transformation from immigrant to American.

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While raised in the land of deep dish pizza, Oldenberg’s lithograph Flying Pizza shows a large, thin-crusted pie, in the style famous in New York, the city he now resides in. Most people might not imagine bread and tomato taking flight, but Oldenburg’s oeuvre is filled with such fanciful moments. The artist is noted for his skill as a draftsman, but he often notes imagination as his great talent. For him, the artist is meant to explore media and ideas in an effort at “defining what art is.” His imagination was essential in this exploration, but he also wanted these works to be grounded in human life. As he noted, “my art is made for human beings, and it’s important that people enjoy the experience of seeing it.” Everyday objects, like pizza, therefore afford people relevancy and surprise at once. These common objects have an anti-elite quality combined with a host of personal experiences viewers can draw on. Who hasn’t eaten pizza? Yet, who has seen a building-sized pizza fly?

Food, therefore, is a potent tool for Oldenburg. Food has a fluidity and ephemerality that appeals to him. He elucidates, “I like food because you can change it. I mean, there is no such thing as a perfect lamb chop; you can make all types of lamb chops. And that’s true of everything. And people eat it and it changes and disappears.”

Some of Oldenburg’s best known sculptures, like Floor Burgerlike the one in the Museum of Modern Art or Dropped Cone, Neumarkt Galerie, Cologne, are commentaries on consumerism, they’re much more about formal concerns. In many ways the content, the meaning of a pizza or a burger don’t matter. As he said, “I always say I’m not doing a hamburger, I’m doing a sculpture.” The plasticity of food, for example, had a great appeal. Food, in its way, is like a sculpture, with its own properties of viscosity, texture, and form. Oldenburg’s efforts at turning food into art brings something common into the viewer’s consciousness.

When Tea Bag was donated to the Akron Art Museum by Case Western Reserve University Art History professor, Harvey Buchanan, he suggested it was “sufficiently ambiguous . . . to be challenging.” Food in Oldenburg’s work embodies many juxtapositions: common and surprising; delicious and inedible; accessible and inscrutable. The overall works are relevant and yet encourage deeper thought. What makes a burger a sandwich and not a sculpture? Why create a fine artwork of a used tea bag? What does it say about our world when we only look at commodities we consume?

The Food:

Oldenburg’s works often show American classics like burgers and pizza. While these are foods most of us usually enjoy at restaurants, in social isolation, you might try your hand at making these old standards at home.

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Burger buns are easy to make. The dough can be made without a stand mixer, just make sure to knead well. If you find yourself needing to ration flour and yeast, make just enough buns as people. The recipe is easily halved or doubled.

Oldenburg’s most famous burger is a slim patty with a pickle. But, other sculptures include a fully loaded burger with lettuce, tomato, and mayo. Whatever toppings you have available work great.

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Pizza is another Oldenburg-inspired food that’s easy to make. Flying Pizza is a thin-crust pie, made with another simple dough recipe. The key to making a perfect pie is rolling the dough out very carefully so it doesn’t tear. Oldenburg’s pizza solely features cheese, but you can take inspiration from his idea that there is no single ideal for food adding your own toppings.

You might end the meal with ice cream — though don’t feel you need to drop it.

Recipes:

Burger buns

Pizza crust

Cooking with the Collection is made possible with support from the Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation and the Samuel Reese Willis Foundation.

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Drawing Day

May 16th is an annual celebration of drawing. We’re celebrating by offering you exercises you can try today or any day.

Learning to draw might be on your social isolation to-do list. Or maybe drawing seems too scary to attempt. If you’ve ever written your name on a piece of paper, you’re prepared to learn to draw. (Download our Drawing Day Booklet for more exercises to try.)

Many people think of drawing as the ability to render realistically. But drawing encompasses many forms of expression.

Doodles could be considered a type of drawing. People don’t feel intimidated about doodling. They’re just marks on the side of your notes — not art, you might think. Those same skills, however, can help you feel comfortable drawing. You’ve spent a lifetime doodling, so you are prepared for these lessons.

Holding your Pencil

Writing is an important form of human communication. After you learn to write, you rarely think about the way the pencil or pen is held. Artists, however, often will shift the tool in their hand to get different effects.

  • Start by picking up your writing utensil. Write a line.
  • Reposition your pencil or pen to hold it an angle. Draw more lines.
  • Continue to play with the angle of the writing tool. Explore the different effects on the paper.
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Shading

Much of the draftsman’s work is knowing how to use your writing utensil to deliver a variety of lines and shades. Pencil control is learned. Artists spend hours honing their abilities. Try these exercises:

  • Filling a sheet of paper with many different strokes.
  • Make 7 equal boxes on your paper. Use a pencil to create a graded scale of shades.
  • Draw the same item, like a coffee cup, in each of the shades from your scale.
  • Draw a houseplant only depicting the shadows.
  • Make a drawing using no lines.
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Contour

Drawing requires translating the three-dimensional world onto the flat surface. Forms can be rendered using shadows and shading or by focusing on the contour edges. In contour drawing, you focus on the outlines of a form rather than the details.

  • Look in the mirror. Draw yourself without looking at the paper. Focus your eyes on your face.
  • Draw something in your kitchen. Use a single line.
  • Draw your pet using a single line. Draw 7 more contour drawings of your pet as they move. (If you don’t have a pet, draw pets from online videos).
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Copying

Drawing requires confidence in your mark-making. Many people falter when they are first trying because their initial sketches don’t “look like anything.” Many artists spend time copying, just as many musicians learn music by playing works written by others. Have you ever tried a step-by-step drawing, like copying a cartoon? Seeing the steps helps you gain confidence. The hardest part of drawing from the real world is translating the three-dimension to a flat surface. When you copy, you translate from one flat surface to another, simplifying the process and increasing your chance of success.

  • Try drawing some of the doodles in the gif.
  • Try drawing from a magazine.
  • Explore the museum’s collection online. Choose 1 work you love. Draw it 20 times.
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Vantage Points

Translating three-dimensional space requires learning how to trick the eye. Draftspeople learn how to use line and shadow to imply depth.

  • Draw the same object from many different angles.
  • Sit on the floor. Draw the room. Find a high stool. Draw the same room.
  • Draw your desk and all of its items. Move across the room. Draw your desk again.
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Gesture Drawing

Strong draftspeople not only have confidence and skill but also decisiveness. Hesitancy is visible in halting lines and inconsistent forms.

  • Draw the clouds. Start your first drawing on the hour. Make a drawing every hour for a whole day.
  • Draw all the people you see in the next show you watch.
  • Draw your pet 100 times.

Color

Life is in living color. Adding color to your drawings immediately transforms the level of realism.

  • Draw a coffee cup in blue. Draw the same object again in another color. Repeat five more times.
  • Draw the forms in your room using 1 color other than black. Add a second color other than black for the shadows.
  • Use color to create a drawing using only dots.
  • Try any of the exercises in the other sections using color.

Thank you for joining us in this exploration of drawing. This is just the tip of the pencil. Keep drawing and healthy.

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Drawing Day — May 16

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May 16th is an annual celebration of drawing. We’re celebrating by offering you exercises you can try today or any day.

Learning to draw might be on your social isolation to-do list. Or maybe drawing seems too scary to attempt. If you’ve ever written your name on a piece of paper, you’re prepared to learn to draw. (Download our Drawing Day Booklet for more exercises to try.)

Many people think of drawing as the ability to render realistically. But drawing encompasses many forms of expression.

Drawing though, is a form of communication, a chance to break the rules, a moment to zone out, a safe place to fail, a new place to succeed, and something anyone can do.

Join us here on May 16th for drawing lessons and a downloadable packet filled with exercises. Also check out the other museums celebrating Drawing Day: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Clyfford Still Museum, Bakersfield Museum of Art, and Catskill Center.

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Social Isolation Haircuts

With social distancing, we can’t get to our stylists and barbers. This tour of the collection offers some suggestions for haircuts. You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to try these styles or not. Take scissors to your coiffe at your own risk.

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Rainy Day, Honoré Guilbeau, (Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1907–2006, Peninsula, Ohio), Lithograph on paper, 8 3/4 in. x 11 3/4 in. (22.23 cm x 29.85 cm), Gift of Mrs. Stanley Okey, 1974.62

A blunt bob, slicked back, so people don’t notice you can’t cut straight, like in Honoré Guilbeau’s lithograph. In this print, the woman’s dismay is apparent; perhaps as the title suggests, the rainy day foiled her plans. The artist, northeast Ohio native Honoré Guilbeau, was a dancer and costume designer early in her career before working as part of the Work Project Administration. She went on to teach at the Akron Art Institute in the 1940s before becoming a nationally recognized book illustrator.

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Eleanor, Chicago, Harry Callahan, (Detroit, Michigan, 1912–1999, Atlanta, Georgia), Gelatin silver print, 9 3/8 in. x 8 15/16 in. (23.81 cm x 22.7 cm), Gift of Harry and Eleanor Callahan, 1991.44

Long, luscious, and wild might be the easiest solution, as in Eleanor Callahan’s locks. Photographer Harry Callahan developed a body of images of his beloved wife, Eleanor. The images were at once fine art and an intimate portrait of a marriage.

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Bridesmaid’s Hairdo, Navalcan, Spain, Inge Morath, (Graz, Austria, 1923–2002, New York, NY), Gelatin silver print, 8 7/8 in. x 13 in. (22.54 cm x 33.02 cm), Gift of the artist, 1998.5

With more time on your hands, this might be the chance to try a vintage style, like setting in waves, particularly if you have a willing partner at home to help you get it just right. You don’t even need a special event, like the Spanish wedding this bridesmaid would be attending, to take time to make the extra effort. This particular photograph from 1955 was created by Inge Morath, studio assistant to renowned photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson.

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The Hoover Company, North Canton, Lee Friedlander, Gelatin silver print, 11 in. x 14 in. (27.94 cm x 35.56 cm), Purchased with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and Central Bank of Akron, 1981.11.73

Or, you could go all out and set your hair in a full bouffant. This photograph by Lee Friedlander shows a worker in North Canton toiling in the Hoover factory. Her commitment to style is enviable. The museum’s collection also includes many more photographs by American artist Lee Friedlander taking in the Northeast Ohio region.

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Kopf (Head), Andre Rouveyre, (Paris, 1879–1962), Woodcut on paper, 10 1/4 in. x 13 1/2 in. (26.04 cm x 34.29 cm), Gift of Mr. Paul F. Binai, 1967.13

Another option is to get out scissors and snip, snip, snip. You could find yourself with a fashionable, stylish coiffure, particularly given you might have time to get out your straight iron. This woodblock is 100 years old, but the look could work today.

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Untitled, Shields Landon Jones, (Indian Mills, Virginia, 1901–1997, Hinton, West Virginia), Ballpoint pen, graphite and crayon on paper, 9 1/2 in. x 7 3/4 in. (24.13 cm x 19.69 cm), Museum Acquisition Fund, 2009.1

But, be warned, cutting bangs can go awry. This untitled drawing offers you a useful cautionary tale for when you get a little too excited about cutting your bangs.

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Untitled, Vivian Maier, (New York, New York, 1926–2009, Chicago, Illinois), Gelatin silver print, 12 in. x 12 in. (30.48 cm x 30.48 cm), Gift of Russell and Barbara Bowman in honor of Mitchell D. Kahan, 2012.39

Then, there is always the easiest option. Just wear a hat, like the lady in Vivian Maier’s photograph. Maier was a prolific photographer with more than 100,000 negatives produced in her five-decade career, creating scenes of life and people in and around Chicago.

Virtual Tours are made possible with support from the Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation, The Sisler McFawn Foundation, The Welty Family Foundation, Dana Pulk Dickinson, and the Lloyd L. & Louise K. Smith Memorial Foundation

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Museum Crossword 5/3/20

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Join us every Sunday for games inspired by museums and collections.

This week’s participating museums: Air Force Space & Missile Museum, Akron Art Museum, Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA), Black Belt Museum, Canadian Museum of History / Musée canadien de l’histoire, Contemporary Jewish Museum, Cumberland Heritage Village Museum, Eastern State Penitentiary, Erie Canal Museum, Genesee Country Village & Museum, Georgia Museum of Art, Joliet Area Historical Museum and Old Joliet Prison, Lynn Museum, Pueblo Grande Museum, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Stories of Lynn, The Wolfsonian–FIU

Play online or download the PDF. (Last week’s answers)

Across

1

Card or Mail order

3

Green Bay or Art

5

The duchess of where opened the Ancient House Museum in 1924? Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life has a hint.

6

The mighty ____ rocket began as America’s first intercontinental ballistic missile, but ended up launching four crewed Project Mercury missions into space in the early 1960s. The Air Force Space & Missile Museum has more.

7

Hangs on a gallery wall

11

Civil War era “texting” code. Learn more at the Genesee Country Village & Museum.

13

Material used to collect maple sap or make canoes. More at the Canadian Museum of History / Musée canadien de l’histoire.

14

Apex predator of the Cretaceous oceans and recent co-star in the Jurassic World movies. Black Belt Museum can give you a hint.

16

Serial number for collections

17

Codex

18

Makes galleries look good

20

Citation entry

22

This crooner’s love of Levi’s gave rise to the term “Canadian tuxedo.” The Contemporary Jewish Museum has more.

26

An object made or used by a human being. Pueblo Grande Museum has many.

27

The Kings Lynn Archive holds quarter sessions listing which Witchfinder as a witness? Learn more at the Stories of Lynn.

28

Maker of exhibitions

DOWN

2

A place to get art

4

What type of oil powdered the lamps at St Margaret’s Church in Kings Lynn until 1829? Lynn Museum has a hint.

5

Now shrinking around the globe, they dramatically impacted life in the Pleistocene and shaped the geography of the Great Plains. Learn more at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum.

8

Early 20th century Swedish artist, whose abstract paintings predate Kandinsky, Malevich, Mondrian, and Klee but only recently received international attention. Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) can give you a hint.

9

Brother to Elwood: Joliet _______. Learn more at the Joliet Area Historical Museum and Old Joliet Prison.

10

This German emigre who designed a desk and chair in the Wolfsonian collection was also the architect and designer of the Walt Disney studios in Burbank. Learn more at The Wolfsonian–FIU.

12

The work of museum curators

13

You can make this environmentally themed craft out of two toilet paper rolls with a little imagination. The Georgia Museum of Art has instructions.

15

Keeper of a museum’s history

19

In printing, when you run out of letters you are out of this. Synonym for unhappy or unwell. Explore Cumberland Heritage Village Museum for more.

21

Resides at the bottom of a page

23

Card or score

24

This famous Victorian-era author visited North America in 1842 to see Niagara Falls and Eastern State Penitentiary.

25

Flat-bottomed boat that travels on natural and artificial waterways. Explore the Erie Canal Museum for a hint.

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Cooking with the Collection: Cindy Sherman

This regular series uses the Akron Art Museum’s collection as a source for inspiration when cooking meals at home. Links to recipes at the end of the post.

Photographer Cindy Sherman is best known for her cinematic images featuring herself as the model. Sherman’s evocative works are not self-portraits. Sherman uses herself partly due to the efficiency of being able to self-direct her scenes: “I use myself the way I would use a mannequin. They’re not autobiographical. They’re not fantasies of mine. I like to work completely alone, so instead of using models I use myself.”

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Untitled, Cindy Sherman (Glen Ridge, New Jersey, 1954 — ). Gelatin silver print. 7 3/16 in. x 5 in. (18.26 cm x 12.7 cm). Museum Acquisition Fund. 2012.22

In her early Film Stills series, the photographs like Untitled (left) show moments both inconsequential and immediately recognizable. The banality of the scene gives the pictures accessibility. The emotional realness of her figures begs the viewer to identify with the subject. As Sherman notes, “I want there to be hints of narrative everywhere in the image so that people can make up their own stories about them.” While the kitchen serves as the backdrop, like in Untitled Film Still 3 in the ICA Boston’s collection, the subjects are seen in thoughtful reverie rather than mid-action. The kitchen is not a space of consumption or construction but instead a place to escape. While in later works Sherman’s costuming and sets deviate farther from the every day, the focus on the subject’s interior moments remains central to her work.

One notable deviation from using herself as the subject came in the late 1980s. Along with images of herself smeared with detritus, blood, and rotting food, Sherman created rancid tablescape images. The grotesque compositions were a commentary of the art world’s commodification of artist’s work. Frustrated with being an art world darling, Sherman pushed the boundaries. As Sherman notes, “let’s see them put this over the dining table — I had fun making those pictures.”

Sherman’s early art is not autobiography. In the last few years, however, as she’s gotten older, she’s broken new ground. She created a series of images she showed on her Instagram. Her numerous pictures of her backyard chickens and tomato crops highlight how her lived experience deviates from the scenes her photographs depict. Sherman’s photographs might transport the viewer to complicated realities but her daily life is more simple.

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The Food and Recipes:

Cindy Sherman was raised in an average Episcopalian family on Long Island. Her oldest sister left home at sixteen to marry and start a cooking school. Sherman was only one at the time.

In interviews, Sherman relates scant information about her youth. Her childhood was somewhat solitary and challenging. Her stories rarely note food. She spent much of her youth, not surprising, playing dress up.

Sherman’s works and interest made her inclusion in a 2014 article in Wallpaper Magazine about artists and food surprising. Sherman contributed a recipe, gnocchi with sage and butter sauce. The recipe is fairly easy, though Sherman warns, “This step is more complicated to explain than it is to execute.”

Cooking with the Collection is made possible with support from the Henry V. and Frances W. Christenson Foundation and the Samuel Reese Willis Foundation.

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Contact Paper Collage

Gina Thomas McGee, Curator of Education

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How many times have you cleaned your house this week? Four thousand? Me, too. Which is why I’m here with a VERY low-mess collage project for you and/or your family today.

Here is what you’ll need:

Clear contact paper

Masking or painter’s tape

Scraps for collage- wrapping paper, tissue paper, ribbons, paper, anything relatively flat

The process:

  1. Choose a spot for your collage. I love doing this on a window so the overall effect is like contemporary stained glass.
  2. Tape the contact paper to your chosen surface with masking tape. I like to do this before I peel off the contact paper backing, so the paper doesn’t stick to itself.
  3. Make sure the sticky side of the contact paper is facing UP
  4. Peel the backing.
  5. Collage! Simply place your scraps in any arrangement on the sticky side of the contact paper.
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This is a great self-directed project for children, who can work on the collage in spurts (while you’re cleaning, again. Or working at home. Or taking a shower. Or hiding in your room eating their Easter candy.) They won’t need scissors, glue, or snacks. Just kidding, they’ll still need snacks.

Adults, this is a great project for days when you want to step away from your phone or computer. The process is really satisfying and even meditative.

Good luck and enjoy! We’d love to see your finished pieces.

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#TryThis is made possible with support from PNC, the Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation, the Alan and Janice Woll Family Fund, OMNOVA Solutions Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M. Richie Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Considine

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Crossword April 26, 2020

Join us every week for a puzzle inspired by museums around the world.

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Play online. Or download a pdf. (Last week’s answers.)

This week’s participating museums are The Aerospace Museum of California, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Akron Art Museum, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA), Billings Estate National Historic Site, Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Contemporary Jewish Museum, Dumbarton House, Erie Canal Museum, Genesee Country Village & Museum, Joliet Area Historical Museum (and Old Joliet Prison), Lombard Historical Society, McMaster Museum of Art, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, The Georgia Museum of Art, The Pueblo Grande Museum, The Ringling, The Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, The Wolfsonian–FIU, and The Woodrow Wilson House.

Across

1

Not eat

6

The Yankton Dakota Sioux activist in House #6 played this musical instrument. The Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum has a hint.

7

Among the last great ukiyo-e artists of this country, Taiso Yoshitoshi (1839–1892) reigned supreme for his daring prints based on various tales and legends. Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) can offer a hint.

8

Atlanta artist Kevin Cole makes art inspired by this men’s accessory and the fight for black suffrage. The Georgia Museum of Art has a hint.

10

This 1950s era jet engine is still the fastest flying jet engine in history and could operate at Mach3+. Learn more at the Aerospace Museum of California.

12

Once a bone

14

The first Secretary of the United States Navy. Dumbarton House has a hint.

18

Whitling

19

President Wilson Wrote his speeches on a Hammond _______featuring a curved keyboard and multiple fonts. The Woodrow Wilson House can help.

20

Often recognized as Canada’s first paleontologist, his formal education was in law. Learn more at the Billings Estate National Historic Site.

22

Wolfsonian founder Mitchell “Micky” Wolfson, Jr. purchased a c. 1876 sideboard by designer E. W. Godwin from this legendary British guitarist, first name Jimmy. Learn more at The Wolfsonian–FIU

24

Wire form

26

This singer-songwriter, who grew up as a “nice Jewish girl” from North London, rose to international success, however briefly and tragically; she was called “the pre-eminent vocal talent of her generation,” by the BBC. Learn more at the Contemporary Jewish Museum.

27

Artist Natalka Husar often paints herself as one of her two alter egos. One is a _____ to represent the artist as both prober and healer of wounds. McMaster Museum of Art has a hint.

33

Dinosaur hunter, in a way

35

Dig

36

Sap

37

Tracks Across Sheldon Peck Art Work. Learn more at the Lombard Historical Society.

38

Old bird

Down

Down

2

Sap Maker

3

Natural history display

4

Box

5

Syrup once

9

This Rochester, NY native founded a picture-perfect company. Genesee Country Village & Museum is the place to learn more.

10

Art of Stuffing

11

Historic site for opening of Blues Brothers. Joliet Area Historical Museum (and Old Joliet Prison) is the place to learn more.

13

Arthropod of old

15

Pertaining to a period of time between AD 1–1200 BC. Learn more at the Pueblo Grande Museum.

16

Dinosaur’s descendent

17

In a portrait by this Spanish, King Philip IV was originally shown wearing armor, but a change of wardrobe was just one of the many modifications the artist made as he created this powerful image of the king. Learn more at The Ringling.

21

Who is the human rights defender pictured on the new Canadian $10 bill? Learn more at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

23

Sample

24

The original Erie Canal, completed in 1825, had 83 of these, built to take the artificial waterway over streams, rivers and other unreliable bodies of water. Explore the Erie Canal Museum for more.

25

To stand straight and to place hands on hips and elbows pointed outwards. Learn more Agnes Etherington Art Centre.

28

Wall-mounted sculpture

29

Largest living member of the deer family; solitary and does not typically befriend squirrels. Royal Saskatchewan Museum can give you a hint.

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Affix

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A type of pie depicted by Oldenburg. Learn more at the Akron Art Museum.

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Malleable

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A sack to dip and a muse for Oldenburg. Learn more at the Akron Art Museum.

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