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Springtime Tour

Take a walk outside without ever leaving your couch!

Hello art lovers — Reggie Lynch, Curator of Community Engagement, here again with another peek at the Akron Art Museum’s permanent collection. This time, in celebration of Earth Day this week, I’m focusing my tour on works that celebrate spring. I know as I take my socially-distanced walks around my neighborhood, it’s been a big relief to see spring flowers poking their heads through the soil. I’m hoping this digital spin through the museum might do the same for you.

Charles H. Davis, And Southward Dreams the Sea, undated

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Charles H. Davis, (Amesbury, Massachusetts, 1856–1933, Mystic, Connecticut), And Southward Dreams The Sea, undated, Oil on canvas, 29 in. x 36 in. (73.66 cm x 91.44 cm), Bequest of Edwin C. Shaw

Maybe it’s my Irish ancestors calling out from the past, but this work has always spoken to me. The exact location of the scene is unknown, and the artist isn’t thought to have traveled to Ireland, but the big blue sky and distant sea below gets me wistful for the blustery spring hills of Ireland. The work’s title, And Southward Dreams the Sea, is likely a reference to the poem “Daisy,” by Francis Thompson, in which the speaker recalls an amorous encounter in a scene much like this one. The title of this work appears in the second stanza of the poem:

The hills look over on the South,

And southward dreams the sea;

And with the sea-breeze hand in hand

Came innocence and she.

Paul Stankard, Brown-Eye Susan bouquet with figures, 1996

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Paul Stankard, (Attleboro, Massachusetts, 1943 — ), Brown-eyed Susan bouquet with figures, 1996, Glass, 3 1/2 in. x 2 3/4 in. x 2 1/2 in. (8.89 cm x 6.99 cm x 6.35 cm), Gift of Annie and Mike Belkin

The Paul Stankard Glass Collection is displayed on the museum’s second floor in a cozy niche that I often walk by as I go to my office in the morning. Each time I do, I’m always surprised to find new details in each little scene. These glass sculptures play on the traditional glass paperweight form, which reached its height of popularity in France during the 19th century. The small figures, flowers, and insects that fill Stankard’s works are entirely made of glass, using a process called flameworking. His minuscule worlds explore cycles of birth, decay, and the unseen forces that usher in these changes. As I’ve walked around my neighborhood these last few weeks, slowly taking in the miniate of spring, these vignettes have popped into my mind.

John Henry Twatchman, The Winding Brook, 1887–1900

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John Henry Twachtman, (Cincinnati, Ohio, 1853–1902, Gloucester, Massachusetts), The Winding Brook, 1887–1900, Oil on canvas, 25 in. x 30 1/8 in. (63.5 cm x 76.52 cm), Bequest of Edwin C. Shaw

Childe Hassam, Bedford Hills, 1908

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Childe Hassam, (Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1859–1935, Easthampton, New York), Bedford Hills, 1908, Oil on canvas, 21 7/8 in. x 25 7/8 in. (55.56 cm x 65.72 cm), Bequest of Edwin C. Shaw
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In looking through the museum’s archives, I found myself drawn to this pairing of John Henry Twachtman’s The Winding Brook with Childe Hassam’s Bedford Hills from a past exhibit Landscapes from the Age of Impressionism (2011)Their place next to one another perfectly encapsulates nature’s diametric pinnacles of color, with Twatchman capturing nature’s autumnal reposing breath, and Hassam showing nature’s first signs of spring. Both artists were early champions of American Impressionism, which was an art movement that prized brightly colored representations of nature. Hassam often went so far as to directly apply paint from the tube to the canvas, as opposed to first mixing pigments to lower their contrast. Often when giving a tour, I’ll stop the group in front of one of these works and ask them to quietly place themselves in the scene. What smells are wafting along on the breeze? What rhythms are playing out in the meandering stream? Can you feel the sun warming your cheeks?

Tiffany Studios, Hanging Head Dragonfly Lamp, after 1902

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Tiffany Studios, Hanging Head Dragonfly Lamp, after 1902, Leaded glass and bronze, 63 in. x 22 in. x 22 in. (160.02 cm x 55.88 cm x 55.88 cm), Gift of the Firestone Foundation

Not all landscapes are paintings. Some of the best depictions of nature from the 20th century were created by Louis C. Tiffany and his Tiffany Studios. Tiffany was an advocate for the Art Nouveau and Aesthetic movements, which focused on showcasing beauty and craftsmanship above all else. Nature and sinuous lines were staple features of both these movements. In this lamp, dragonflies hover at the edge of a dappled green shade, as if poised on the banks of a rippling spring pond. The shade’s abstract pattern also mimics the delicately webbed texture of a dragonfly’s wing. Furthering this natural theme, the base of the lamp was designed to look like a cluster of pond reeds that extend up from a water lily. The overall effect is one of quiet contemplation. You can almost hear the trees rustle as a breeze lifts these dragonflies through the air.

Thanks for joining in on this mini-nature walk through the collection. If you’re feeling curious about the rest of the museum’s landscape collection, you can always check out more of those works here.

Virtual Tours are made possible with support from the Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation, The Sisler McFawn Foundation, The Welty Family Foundation, Dana Pulk Dickinson, and the Lloyd L. & Louise K. Smith Memorial Foundation.

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#MuseumGames #Crossword April 19, 2020

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The weekly crossword features museums from around the world. This week’s museums include Air Force Space & Missile Museum, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life (part of Norfolk Museums Service), Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Canadian Museum of History , Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Fenton History Center, George C. Marshall Museum & Library, Georgia Museum of Art, Henry Plant Museum, The Nasher Sculpture Center, Pueblo Grande Museum, Stories of Lynn, Studio Art Quilt Associates, The Contemporary Jewish Museum, The Franklin Institute, The Kimbell Art Museum, The Lynn Museum (part of Norfolk Museums Service), The Meadows Museum, The Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, The Royal Saskatchewan Museum, The USS Constitution Museum, The Westerville History Center & Museum, The Wolfsonian–FIU, and the USC Fisher Museum of Art.

To play online. To print a pdf. (Last week’s answers)

Across

2

Opposite of verso

5

Skip

7

Character archetype possessed of secret knowledge and a disregard for conventional behaviour, named Wi-sa-ke-cahk by the Cree, Nanabush by the Saulteaux, Inktome by the Dakota and Nakota, and Sagija’k by the Dene. Learn more at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum.

8

Receiver of printer’s ink

11

During WWI, a political pressure group called the Anti-Saloon League published political cartoons to turn American sentiment against German ____ living in the U.S. & gain support for national alcohol Prohibition. The Westerville History Center & Museum is the place to learn more.

13

Star

14

The Jessie Street Power Substation, which is now home to The Contemporary Jewish Museum, was damaged during this major disaster of April 18, 1906. Learn more at the Contemporary Jewish Museum.

16

Benjamin Franklin created this musical instrument after seeing performers make music with glasses of water. Learn more at the Franklin Institute.

19

As an important figure in the _______ _________, Augusta Savage worked with other important leaders, writers, musicians, and artists to celebrate the contributions of African American culture to American society. Learn more at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.

21

Not recto

23

Twice

25

The U.S. Air Force operates the Eastern Range, which is a historic 10,000 mile rocket testing range that begins at Cape ________ and extends through the south Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. Learn more at the Air Force Space & Missile Museum.

30

World-renowned Canadian architect or brilliantly coloured songbird. Canadian Museum of History has a hint.

32

The figures in this painting by Winslow Homer are enjoying a quiet game of ______ in the countryside. The Albright-Knox Art Gallery is the place to learn more.

34

Pottery decorated with three or more colors. Learn more at the Pueblo Grande Museum.

35

At first glance, this object may look only decorative, when in reality it is a _____. The Henry Plant Museum can offer a hint.

36

In the sculpture “Flowers in a Vase,” Pablo Picasso modeled clay flowers using ___________ molds. Learn more at the Nasher Sculpture Center.

37

Art quilter Carole ___ or metal paper fasteners. Studio Art Quilt Associates has a hint.

38

A shepherd’s concern. The Meadows Museum has a hint.

Down

1

Early animation device invented by English mathematician William George Horner in 1834. Learn more at The Museum of Early Trades & Crafts.

3

Cup or cheese

4

General George C. Marshall pushed this all-terrain vehicle into production during WWII. Learn more at the George C. Marshall Museum & Library.

6

After his stunning 1812 victory, Captain William Bainbridge commissioned this artist to paint his portrait. Unfortunately, they disagreed on the way the uniform was portrayed and eventually another artist was hired to finish. The USS Constitution Museum has a hint.

9

Sculptural wall hanging

10

Wetlands where printmaker Victoria Hutson Huntley made images of bird life. Learn more at the Georgia Museum of Art.

12

Where was Frederick Savage who made merry-go-rounds born in 1828? The Lynn Museum (part of Norfolk Museums Service) has a hint.

13

Snippers

15

An early hire of Frank Lloyd Wright and the person largely responsible for his design drawing style, this female architect (first name) worked with her husband to design Melbourne’s famed Capitol Theatre. Learn more at The Wolfsonian–FIU.

17

22nd Governor of New York State, lived in Jamestown NY. Learn more at the Fenton History Center.

18

What league was a group of powerful trading towns and cities around the Baltic and North seas which included Kings Lynn? Learn more at Stories of Lynn.

20

Where baby places their head

22

What is the surname of the warrener who lived in part of what is now Ancient House in 1901? Learn more at the Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life (part of Norfolk Museums Service).

24

American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer created the installation called ________ in response to the intimidation of artists, teachers, and countless other citizens during the McCarthy Era. Learn more at the USC Fisher Museum of Art.

26

Popular Hindu god worshipped as a remover of obstacles and bestower of good fortune, prosperity, and health. The Kimbell Art Museum has a hint.

27

Whiskey

28

This renowned art museum and film center holds the world’s largest collections of Hans Hofmann paintings, African American quilts, and 35mm Japanese film prints (outside of Japan). What is the acronym to abbreviate its name? Here is a hint.

29

Patricia for short

31

Hard or crystal

33

Type of chocolate

35

Felines

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation

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How are you? Really.

Really. Hopefully, you’re finding time to care for yourself amidst strange schedules, social distancing, and lots of time at home. If you need a little help, hop on this self-care tour and let artwork from the collection lead the way.

First Stop: Time for a Retreat!

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Thomas Wilmer Dewing, (Boston, Massachusetts, 1851–1938, New York, New York), Symphony in Green and Gold, 1900, Oil on panel, 36 in. x 48 in. (91.44 cm x 121.92 cm), Bequest of Edwin C. Shaw

The artist behind this dreamy scene liked to gather up his painter friends, head into nature, and spend time away from the hustle and bustle of their everyday lives.

Your turn: Take a seat and imagine your ultimate relaxing vacation.

Where would you go? Who would you bring?

Next Stop: #goals

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Alma W. Thomas, (Columbus, Georgia, 1891–1978, Washington, D.C.), Pond — Spring Awakening, 1972
Acrylic on canvas, 68 in. x 55 in. (172.72 cm x 139.7 cm), Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David K. Anderson

After retiring from her career as an art teacher in 1960, this artist devoted herself fulltime to making art. She eventually became the first African American woman to have a solo exhibition at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art. How’s that for a retirement plan?

PSSST: This artwork has a secret. It looks abstract but the colors, lines, and shapes here are meant to represent a pond in the spring. Head to your window and see how many signs of spring you can spot. If you have time, head out and take a few deep breaths surrounded by nature.

Next: Meditation

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Mark Rothko, (Dvinsk, Russia, 1903–1970, New York), Untitled, 1949, Oil on canvas, 64 in. x 43 in. x 2 1/2 in. (162.56 cm x 109.22 cm x 6.35 cm), Private Collection

This painting is not just a painting. It is a tool for meditation. Rothko considered these floating rectangles doorways between the physical and spiritual worlds.

OOOOM: Sink into this deep pool of blue and see if you can clear your mind. Here are some meditation 101 tips to get you started

1. Get comfortable

To get started, it doesn’t matter whether you sit or lay down as long as you are comfortable. You can sit cross-legged, on the floor, or on a chair. If you can sit erect, then great. If not, it’s just important to have your body in a somewhat stable position. Then have the palms of your hands face the sky.

2. Become “present”

Become totally aware of your current surroundings. What do you hear? How does it feel to sit? Do you feel tension? Where are your thoughts?

3. Focus on your breath

As you take long and deep breaths, feel your breath move from your lungs and out through your nostrils or your throat. (Breathing through your nostrils is better though either will work). Your mind will wander (which is okay), just try your best to be as focused as possible.

4. Feel your body

Once you’re focused, take notice of your body and how each body part feels. Start with the toes and work your way up to your head. If your mind continues to wander, bring your thoughts back to your breath. Breathe 5 to 10 times with full concentration on each breath.

Take it a step further and hum “Om” as you breathe out.

Next Stop: Party Time

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Mickalene Thomas, (Camden, New Jersey, 1971 — ), Girlfriends and Lovers, 2008, Acrylic, enamel and rhinestones on panel, 108 in. x 144 in. (274.32 cm x 365.76 cm), The Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Endowment Fund for Painting and Sculpture, 2010.1

Yes, relaxing is nice, but so is blowing off some steam with your best buddies by your side. These ladies sure know how to go glam for a night on the town.

JUST DO IT: Get out your phone right now. Yes, now. Send a message to one person you like (friend, colleague, family) and set up a time to connect by phone or video chat. How about a digital dance party?

Next stop: No News is Good News

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Lee Bontecou, (Providence, Rhode Island, 1931 — ), Untitled, 1966, Painted iron, fiberglass and fabric, 41 in. x 29 in. x 8 in. (104.14 cm x 73.66 cm x 20.32 cm), Gift of Leo Castelli, Castelli Galleries

This artist was profoundly affected by World War II and has poignant memories of her mother wiring submarine parts in a factory during the war. These early experiences awakened a lifelong political awareness that fueled the intensity of much of her work.

She Said: “I was angry. I used to work with the United Nations program on the short-wave radio in my studio. I used it like background music, and in a way, the anger became part of the process. During World War II we’d been too young. But at that later time [the 1950s and 1960s], all the feelings I’d had back then came to me again.”

COOL DOWN: What strategies do you use to deal with anger or disappointment? Do you angry-clean your house? Go for a walk? Call a friend? Use the tools that work for you to find calm.

Finally: Treat Yourself

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Richard Estes, (Kewanee, Illinois, 1932 — ), Food City, 1967, Oil, acrylic and graphite on fiberboard, 48 in. x 68 in. (121.92 cm x 172.72 cm), Purchased, by exchange, with funds raised by the Masked Ball 1955–1963

This elaborate scene contains lots of yummy treats

(and super low prices!)

YUMMM: What is your favorite comfort food? Jot it down and make a plan to add the ingredients to your shopping list (or take-out rotation).

Need more? Search the collection database for anything you find calming. Just type in a keyword, year, or artist and let the journey begin.

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Try This: Shaving Cream Marbling

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Art projects at home always SOUND like a good idea, until you think about the set-up, tear-down and clean-up (especially with children, amirite?!) Have no fear, this technique yields incredible results with few supplies, little effort, and minimal mess. I did it in about six minutes with my four year old and no people or household items were harmed. Let’s jump in, shall we?*

Supplies:

Shaving cream (foaming, not gel)
Liquid food coloring or liquid watercolors
Shallow pan or tray
Paper
A tool for stirring (bamboo skewer, plastic knife, etc)
Squeegee or piece of cardboard for removing shaving cream from paper
Paper towels, wipes, or towels

The HOW:

Gather all of your supplies. Here was our dining room set-up. That blue tray is the lid to a storage container.

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Fill your tray with a shallow layer of shaving cream. Just enough to coat the bottom of the tray is fine.

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Spread evenly. Remind yourself this is NOT whipped cream.

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Squirt several drops of each color onto the surface of the shaving cream.

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Swirl colors around in shaving cream.

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Place paper on top of shaving cream and pat lightly, just so the paper makes even contact with the shaving cream.

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Pull your paper off and lay flat on your table or tray.

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Squeegee off all shaving cream with squeegee or cardboard.

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MARVEL at your talent. The best part is the paper and coloring will be DRY as soon as you get all of the shaving cream off. So, no mess and no drying time. WIN!

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Now that you’re feeling confident, feel free to use the same tray again. You can add more colors or simply use what is in your pan as long as there is color to pick up.

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Use your beautiful paper as stationary, frame it, wrap gifts with it, the possibilities are endless. If you tackle this project, post photos and tag the museum. Happy Marbling!

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Optional follow-up activities:

Let children bring the finished tray full of shaving cream into the bathtub and play with the foam to their hearts’ content and then wash the remainder down the drain. The food coloring WILL stain hands, but will come out after a few generous washings with soap.

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#TryThis is made possible with support from PNC, the Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation, the Alan and Janice Woll Family Fund, OMNOVA Solutions Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M. Richie Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Considine.

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#5WomenArtists at AAM

Akron Art Museum showcases Modern and Contemporary art in its beautiful setting in Northeast Ohio. The museum onsite galleries are closed to the public as part of the public health efforts. But, our online galleries are available, as they always have been, 24×7. We’ll be regularly posting virtual tours on all our social platforms, so you may enjoy the #MuseumatHome.

My Name is Reggie Lynch and I’m the Curator of Community Engagement at the museum. I work to make sure the museum’s programming and interpretation are relevant and accessible to our community.

Can you name #5womenartists? I certainly can! Follow along on this virtual tour to learn a little bit about some artists from the museum’s collection who changed the course of history.

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1. Alma Thomas, Pond — Spring Awakening, 1972

After retiring from a 38-year career as an art teacher, Alma Thomas would go on to spend the last 18 years of her life gaining significant recognition for her abstract work. Thomas created this workin the same year that she became the first African-American woman to be featured in a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. In this image, one of the Akron Art Museum’s educators is challenging a group of students to think about how Thomas’ abstraction got its title: Pond — Spring Awakening. I’ve had students in the galleries who swear they see koi swimming in this pond!

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2. Viola Frey, Woman and the World,

Viola Frey was a pioneering ceramicist whose monumental sculptures pushed ideas of what ceramics can be as a medium and as a mode of expression. Most frequently, these sculptures explore themes of gender and identity. During the summer of 2019, Frey’s Woman and the World was a centerpiece of a dance performance at the Akron Art Museum in partnership with NCCAkron and DANCECleveland. Whenever I see this piece, I’m never sure whether the woman is turning her back on the world or is about to pick it up and carry it on her back. What do you think?

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3. Yayoi Kusama, Arm Chair, 1963

Yayoi Kusama and her career are a master class in determination and perseverance. Although she faced childhood traumas and continues to struggle with her mental health, by 1993 her talent was so undeniable that Japan named her as the first woman to represent the country at the prestigious Venice Biennale. This image from the 1970s is from the museum’s Archives and the work was created during one of Kusama’s most prolific phases. For Kusama, art has continually been a way to channel her difficult thoughts and bring viewers into her state of mind. For me, viewing and making art always makes me feel connected to other people and distracts my sometimes anxious thoughts. What does making or viewing art do for you?

Image taken from the museum’s archives

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4. Jenny Holzer, All Fall Text: Selections from Truisms, (1977–79), Living, (1980–82) and Survival, (1983–85), 2012

Ohio native Jenny Holzer is best known for her provocative works that use phrases and words to question societal structures. Her early works were mostly 2D, but in 1982 she installed her first electronic sign in the middle of Times Square. With its colorful, busy lights, this work is meant to recall that installation and more than once I’ve caught visitors taking a long look as they try to read the full message. It often gets me thinking: what would I say if I could run text through Times Square or at a museum? What do you think — what would you say?

Imagine taken during the 2020 Midwinter Blues Concert at the Akron Art Museum

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5. Helen Frankenthaler, Wisdom, 1969

Last, but certainly not least, is my personal favorite from our collection by Helen Frankenthaler. Very often, I’ve had conversations with people about how abstract works like this shouldn’t be considered art and I’ve heard the ever-popular argument “My kid could do that!” I get it! Abstract art isn’t for everyone, and that’s okay. But here’s where I get defensive of Frankenthaler: she and the other abstract painters of her day did this before anyone else thought to do it and she did it in a way that no one else was doing at that time. She invented a new technique called soak-stain, in which the canvas hasn’t been primed, so the paint soaks through the cloth canvas, creating soft pools and edges to the puddles of paint. She didn’t believe there were ever mistakes in art but thought instead about how a “wrong turn” was just a chance to take a different perspective. I’ve found myself coming back to this piece over and over. I’ll often let my gaze go soft and just rest in the warm colors and soft lines. To me, this work is peaceful and energizing all at once. Do you have any works of art that make you feel this way?

And that’s that. If you had trouble naming 5 women artists before this, now you’re an expert! Keep these pioneering women in mind when we reopen — you never know how they might strike you!

Virtual Tours are made possible with support from the Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation, The Sisler McFawn Foundation, The Welty Family Foundation, Dana Pulk Dickinson, and the Lloyd L. & Louise K. Smith Memorial Foundation.

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#MuseumGames #Sudoku April 12

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The Akron Art Museum works with museums around the world to create weekly crosswords and other puzzles. This week, we’ve added a Sudoku puzzle. Museums have a few clues to help you get through the puzzle.

Participating Museums: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and SciencesAllentown Art MuseumAncient House Museum of Thetford Life (part of Norfolk Museums Service)Antique Gas and Steam Engine MuseumAppleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida; BAMPFA Canadian War Museum Contemporary Jewish MuseumDelaware Art MuseumErie Canal MuseumFairfield UniversityGeorgia Museum of ArtGettyHammer Museum at UCLAHolden ArboretumKean University GalleriesKimbell Art MuseumLong Island Children’s MuseumNew-York Historical SocietyOld World WisconsinPeabody Essex MuseumPoster HousePueblo Grand MuseumRoyal Saskatchewan MuseumSan Antonio Museum of ArtStories of LynnThe Delaware Natural History Museum The Johnson CollectionThe Lynn Museum (part of Norfolk Museums Service) ; University of Michigan Museum of Natural HistoryWestmoreland Museum of American ArtWolfsonian-FIU

CLUES

A. How many daughters did Maharajah Duleep Singh have? Learn more at Ancient House Museum of Thetford Life (part of Norfolk Museums Service).

B. Part of how the Stenberg Brothers signed their posters. Learn more at Poster House.

C. Due to an increased loss of biodiversity, scientists are discussing whether the earth is undergoing another mass extinction. If so, how many mass extinctions would the Earth have experienced? Learn more at the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History.

D. The Delaware Natural History Museum has 3?, 000 egg clutches.

E. While working as a ticket collector at a tourist attraction, self-taught artist Minnie Evans sold her drawings for ?0 cents each. The Johnson Collection can give you a clue.

F.On which day of January 1840 did Kings Lynn born writer Fanny Burney die?TheLynn Museum (part of Norfolk Museums Service) can share more.

G. The oldest collection work is an object from 184? at the Antique Gas and Steam Engine Museum.

H. Long Island Children’s Museum was awarded the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor conferred on museums and libraries in recognition of their extraordinary service to the community, in 201?. Learn more at Long Island Children’s Museum.

I. Double of this number or the number of acres of forested land on which the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida resides.

J. On King’s Lynn Town Hall, which King Charles’ coat of arms is on the porch? Learn more at Stories of Lynn.

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation

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Animals #MuseumGames #Crossword April 12

This week’s crossword is available online as well. For a pdf. (Last week’s answers).

Participating Museums: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and SciencesAllentown Art MuseumAncient House Museum of Thetford Life (part of Norfolk Museums Service)Antique Gas and Steam Engine MuseumAppleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida; BAMPFA Canadian War Museum Contemporary Jewish MuseumDelaware Art MuseumErie Canal MuseumFairfield UniversityGeorgia Museum of ArtGettyHammer Museum at UCLAHolden ArboretumKean University GalleriesKimbell Art MuseumLong Island Children’s MuseumNew-York Historical SocietyOld World WisconsinPeabody Essex MuseumPoster HousePueblo Grand MuseumRoyal Saskatchewan MuseumSan Antonio Museum of ArtStories of LynnThe Delaware Natural History Museum The Johnson CollectionThe Lynn Museum (part of Norfolk Museums Service) ; University of Michigan Museum of Natural HistoryWestmoreland Museum of American ArtWolfsonian-FIU

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Across

6

Not spat

8

Akron Art Museum’s watcher.

9

These social sea creatures are sometimes called canaries of the sea. Check out more at the Shedd Aquarium for more.

10

One in the herd in Akron Art Museum’s watercolor.

12

Ingredient in the making of Yellow Paper. Check out the Metropolitan Museum of Art for more.

13

This animal is “bad luck for the Axis.” The Wolfsonian-FIU can help.

18

Turtle’s landloving friend.

19

Bus

21

Not parchment

23

Not a horn

25

What is the nickname of the world’s largest and oldest Tyrannosaurus rex?Royal Saskatchewan Museum can help.

29

Fly-in to the Eastern Broadleaf Forest at the Holden Arboretum.

30

Big or Early

32

A long-tailed, often colorful, New World parrot. Learn more at the Pueblo Grand Museum.

33

N.C. Wyeth’s media, like in this work from the Delaware Art Museum.

37

Bivalve

38

Los Angeles-based Conceptual artist John Baldessari (1931–2020) made many images of animals. This one is blue and looks right at you! The Hammer Museum at UCLA is the place to find the answer.

39

Starter for fish or light.

40

Conrad Ruiz’s 2009 watercolor “Overload,” shown at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) in 2018 features Barack Obama flying through the air atop this breed of dog.

41

The greatest mascot in college sports, representing the Georgia Museum of Art’s home institution.

43

Although Alfred Bryan Wall painted some portraits, he became known for creating quiet, pastoral scenes which usually included this animal, ____________. Learn more at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

44

The young Michelangelo studied its scales to create convincing demons for his first known painting. The Kimbell Art Museum is the place to learn more.

45

Night bird.

DOWN

1

Bald or Eyed

2

Animal in the 1975 Pink Panther movie, “It’s Pink, but is it — ?” Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences could tell you more.

3

One of the creatures in Getty’s 16th-century manuscript.

4

Known for its strength and smarts, a work animal sometimes named Sal. Learn more at the Erie Canal Museum.

5

Not ate

7

The name of the beloved dog belonging to the American portrait painter Thomas Sully and his wife Sarah. Learn more at the San Antonio Museum of Art.

11

The name of the bear who was the inspiration for Winnie the Pooh (also a Canadian city). Check out the Canadian War Museum for more.

12

Before so or not

14

Hours before the Nazis marched into Paris in June 1940, the creators of this famous character fled on bicycles, carrying drawings for their children’s stories including one about a mischievous monkey. The Contemporary Jewish Museum is the place to learn more.

15

One of the creatures in Getty’s work.

16

Not eat

17

Watery high-fiver

20

Not yes

22

Red dye

24

This animal featured in Julie Oakes, “Three Canadian Artists Reflect on the Natural World” is frequently seen in the densely populated state where it was shown in 2016. Learn more Kean University Galleries.

25

Lady liberty is made in this technique, in this Peabody Essex Museum work.

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Not no

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Benjamin Franklin’s suggestion for the national bird

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This type of forest is the site of Old World Wisconsin.

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St. Margaret of Antioch is often depicted with what mythical creature? Legend states that she was devoured whole by this creature before she escaped by cutting herself out of its stomach. Learn more at the Allentown Art Museum.

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Chewed stuff

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Not frog

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Source of ivory

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The noble forest creature depicted on this dish is also Fairfield University’s mascot!

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Not sit

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Type of shell atop the handle of New York Yacht Club’s pitcher, now in the New-York Historical Society.

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Harbor or grey.

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation

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Morris Louis Mug

Even if your office is perfect, you might want to spruce up your mug for a bit of a change. This project is inspired by American painter Morris Louis, whose works feature large expanses of dripped paint. Louis poured diluted acrylic onto unprimed canvases, the surface becoming a document of the interactions between poured layers. The washes of color in his paintings were celebrated by viewers and critics alike. More of Morris Louis’ works can be seen at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, who also holds his archives. This interview by Dr. Sophia Bloom offers an interesting reminiscence about the artist.

SUPPLY LIST:
White mug
Cardboard box
Nail polish

This project can be done outside or where there is good ventilation. Find a white mug and an old box.

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1. Louis used diluted acrylic paints, but we’re employing old nail polish. This project is a great use for the old green, yellow, or primary colors you don’t feel like wearing anymore.

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2. Drip the nail polish from one edge of the mug. If the nail polish is thick, you might need to thin it with acetone.

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3. Let the mug dry thoroughly.

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4. Enjoy your art inspired home office.

#TryThis is made possible with support from PNC, the Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation, the Alan and Janice Woll Family Fund, OMNOVA Solutions Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M. Richie Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Considine.

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Sculptural Binder Clips

Organized spaces can be the most productive ones. We’ve helped you spruce up your folders and your bookshelves, but what about those piles of paper? Binder clips help keep stacks together and are also a great surface for adornment.

This binder clip project can be inspired by any of our collection works, easily searchable on our website. Our example was inspired by Claes Oldeburg. The sculptor’s Inverted Q from 1976 greets visitors in AAM’s lobby.

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In creating the sculpture, Oldenburg created drawings and preparatory sculptures.

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Claes Oldenburg, (Stockholm, Sweden, 1929 — ), Study for Sculpture in the form of an inverted Q: above and below ground, 1975, Lithograph, etching and aquatint on paper, 14 in. x 11 1/4 in. (35.56 cm x 28.58 cm), Museum Acquisition Fund

Each artwork is fascinating on its own, but together, they make a whimsical set of binder clips.

SUPPLY LIST:
Binder clips
Polymer clay
Glue

  1. Find binder clips.
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2. Explore the collection online for your inspiration. If you want to make the Oldenburg sculptures, try this page. Once you do, draw your ideas. Using Fimo or other polymer clays, create your tiny sculptures.

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3. Bake your creations according to the instructions on your clay’s packaging. Once they are cool, use hot glue to affix them to binder clips.

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#TryThis is made possible with support from PNC, the Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation, the Alan and Janice Woll Family Fund, OMNOVA Solutions Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M. Richie Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Considine

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HEAVY METAL

Time to rock out to some heavy metal — sculpture style. Let’s take a tour of three metal artworks that are both beautiful and hardcore. First up? This tricky number:

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Richard Deacon, (Bangor, Wales, 1949 — ), Cover, 1990, Medium density fiberboard, wood and copper, 72 in. x 132 in. x 48 in. (182.88 cm x 335.28 cm x 121.92 cm), Museum Acquisition Fund and The Mary S. and Louis S. Myers Endowment Fund for Painting and Sculpture

The artist calls this copper and wood piece Cover, but what exactly is it covering? Use your imagination to fill in the blanks, or in this case, to peek under the metal facade. Can you imagine what is underneath? Do a little doodle of what might be lurking inside.

Stop two, this biting black and white beauty

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Lee Bontecou, (Providence, Rhode Island, 1931 — ), Untitled, 1966, Painted iron, fiberglass and fabric, 41 in. x 29 in. x 8 in. (104.14 cm x 73.66 cm x 20.32 cm), Gift of Leo Castelli, Castelli Galleries

Yikes, are those teeth?! If you see them, you might be experiencing pareidolia, the phenomenon of seeing faces in everyday objects. Here, the artist uses metal bits and pieces (along with fiberglass and fabric) to create this ominous artwork. Can you create faces out of the doorknobs, buttons, zippers, and windows that surround you? Go on a photo scavenger hunt to track them down in the wild.

Last stop — this grand, glimmering piece

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El Anatsui, (Anyako, Ghana, 1944 — ), Dzesi II, 2006, Aluminum liquor bottle caps and copper wire, 117 in. x 195 in. x 8 in. (297.18 cm x 495.3 cm x 20.32 cm), Purchased, by exchange, with funds from Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Reed II

What exactly are you looking at here? A textile of some sort, like a quilt or flag? Guess again. This sculpture is composed of folded, crumpled, and crushed metal liquor bottle caps. The artist and his assistants have meticulously created elaborate folds and then wired the pieces together into this shimmering creation. Can you create your own large-scale artwork using tiny materials from around your home or office?

Congrats, you’ve made it through a heavy metal tour and you totally shredded it. Look for more metallic masterpieces in the museum’s collection at www.akronartmuseum.org/collection

Virtual Tours are made possible with support from the Sandra L. and Dennis B. Haslinger Family Foundation, The Sisler McFawn Foundation, The Welty Family Foundation, Dana Pulk Dickinson, and the Lloyd L. & Louise K. Smith Memorial Foundation.

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