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Gamer Girl

by Emily Horton, Emily Turner, Jules Apicella, Pay Hosman, and Sam Finston

Screen from Gamer Girl

A stalker-filled twist on the dating simulator genre that pits its female protagonist against an entirely male programming class. Spend your semester fighting against sexism like your academic career depends on it (and it kinda does).

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Berrymandering

by Eliot Aretskin-Hariton and Justin Gray

Berrymandering is a strategy board game for players 8 to 88 and plays in 15 minutes. During the game players will cut and eat cake in order to earn candles. The player with the most candles becomes the new ruler of Cakeland. Family friendly, easy to learn, hard to master.

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Obelisk

by Eliot Aretskin-Hariton

Obelisk is a cooperative strategy game for ages 12+ with a playtime of 30 minutes. Players must work together to create a maze coral escaping monsters and capture them before they escape. If even one gets out, they’ll eat the queen’s roses!

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Doodlebug: An Interactive Game

Doodlebug graphic

Following along on a tour through the Akron Art Museum with Doodlebug, the art loving bug. During your visit, you’ll get the chance to meet four different paintings from the museum’s collection and ask them questions about themselves and their makers. This game was created by staff member Tyler Stallsmith, with illustrations by staff member Maria Uhase. It was included as part of GameFest Akron 2020 to offer visitors an interactive and playful way to engage with the collection. Next time you visit the museum, you may recognize some of the friends you meet in this game – except for Doodlebug, of course! He’s too shy for that!

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10 Ways to Connect with Local Artists

Artists live and work in every community. Local galleries and art schools are great ways to find the best of your regional art scenes. Northeast Ohio has many wonderful arts spaces, such as  Rubber City Print, Akron Soul Train, Summit Art Space, and many more in our neighbors to the North, Cleveland.

We’ve also enjoyed sharing our physical and digital spaces with regional artists since March and will continue to do so throughout 2021. 

Here are some local artists experiences to enjoy:

Two on-site exhibitions feature art by regional artists. Akron Art Mail features commissioned postcard-sized works by 24 artists and writers and YOU. This special exhibition includes a selection of art made by the community. Just make a 4X6 postcard and mail it to the museum. For more information, check out the Akron Art Mail page.

Making Your Mark is focused on showcasing the process and purpose of art making. Nine regional artists are featured in this show with works ranging from prints, installation, and painting.

  Twenty-four local artists sat down for informal conversations with our Deputy Director and Chief Experience Officer, Seema Rao for our series, On Process. These far-ranging conversations touch on life during isolation, art making, and teaching as well as heady social issues like racism, environmental decline, and colonialism. Stream the entire series on demand on our YouTube channel or catch them each week on Saturdays on our social media feed.

  Maria Uhase is a regional artist with extremely fine craftsmanship and a quirky sense of style. Her otherworldly creatures will give you something to marvel at. See more of Maria’s work here.

Anthony Angelilli is a regional artist whose work digests and contemplates a wide variety of materials. Each piece explores different textures and layering, and he often finds creative uses for common objects, such as rocks in his work. See more of Anthony’s work here.

Alexandria Couch is a regional artist who uses a combination of traditional and found materials. Using mediums like gouache and acrylic, Alex explores self-discovery and the formation of identity as a minority through her work. See more of Alexandria’s work here.

Jason Milburn is a regional artist with a very detailed style that is evident in his drawings and self-portraits. Jason uses ink and collage on paper to explore memories and nostalgia in his work. See more of Jason’s work here.

Certainty is not readily available in life these days. Art and music can be helpful in helping you make sense of the abstract in life. Local musician, Theron Brown, shares his thoughts about abstraction in the Podcast episode Abstract.

Drawing might feel scary. But mark-making, writing, and doodling are available to everyone. Our YouTube channel has an entire playlist of resources. Akron artist, Maria Alejandra Zanetta can also give you some inspiration in the Podcast episode Mark-Making. 

Staying playful can be hard when times are uncertain. We got advice from Akron artist, Alex Couch on the Podcast episode Play.

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Museum Crossword

This crossword invites you to use your word smarts and the online collection to get to the right answer.

Play the game virtually or print it out.

Clues

Across

2 Good for art bad for crime

5 Canvas alternative

6 Good for a body or canvas

10 Art to see from the back

11 Media for Jenny. (See)

15 Malleable

17 Go with it or Morris Louis‘ application method.

19 Not one look but __ glare according to Julian (See)

20 Art is sometimes on it

21 Deed to a car

22 For a skillet or a canvas

23 These friends know how to sparkle. Check them out.

26 Winning medal or media used by Lynda Benglis. (See)

27 Some of the Akron Art Museum’s favorite people29Good ones are great to have, if Matthew Kolodziej’s title is any advice. (See)

31 Sad

32 Something to clean or the name for the series of paintings Gene Davis began in 1977 (See)

33 Media Van Duzer used to make his still life (See)

35 Sort of (For clue)

36 Only 39 cents a pound, according to Estes. (See)

38 Weigh it

40 With or without egg for some artists

41 A silkscreener’s must have

42 Pestacide-free food or art with irregular shapes

44 How an artist gets sharp

45 Swimmer and Painter’s work

46 A cat or the last name of a minimalist sculptor. (See)

Down

1 Images in order

3 Course or the street Gleitsmann commemorated. (See)

4 Sculpture on the wall

5 What Viola calls her sculptures. (See)

6 90s Rock Band

7 Muse for Painter William Merritt Chase. (See)

8 The make up of things

9 Tie or Markmaking

12 Art sometimes lives on it

13 Plate made art

14 Not at the fore

16 Our spring awakening was brought to us by ___ Thomas. (See)

17 Candle’s work or a word in the title of a little known Elvis movie. (See)

18 It’s cool to be square

24 Frank Stella’s relief comes in this kind of metal. (See)

25 Car Scent or media for John Sokol. (See)

28 They help you cut it out

30 Line up tool

31 Something to use in a bathroom or studio

34 How Artists Stick with It

37 Something to get rid of for some, but something to hang on the wall if you’re Frankenthaler. (See)

39 A state, a song, and Nevelson’s work. (See)

43 Chalky art supply or not chalky art supply

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from Acme Fresh Market, the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation.

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10 Ways to Explore Art

Many of us might feel a little out of sorts when faced with trying to understand modern and contemporary art. A little bit of knowledge can go a long way. Knowing about the artist’s motivation or the quality of the technique might make you think differently. Sometimes just looking closely at the details in the work can grow your appreciation. If nothing else, these short experiences are a nice diversion. 

Here are ten bite-sized nuggets of info to give you something to think about when looking closer:

Wilson’s largest and most complex assemblage, Retrospective summarizes and celebrates the many different types of objects that she incorporated into her work over the course of more than fifty years.

Joseph O’Sickey believed “The subject doesn’t matter… what the artist brings to it is the important thing.”

The photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto asked himself “What would be the most unchanged scene on the surface of the earth?”

In this mysterious image, a lone figure draped in a flowing white garment seems to press into the wind as an ocean wave breaks in the background. Her bent pose is unusual and it is unclear why she has her hands clasped behind her head. Is she injured? Is she trying to take off her dress?

Realizing that works of art do not always need to be complicated or laboriously constructed, Richard Tuttle instead celebrates delicate slightness.

As a prominent participant in the Regionalist movement, Thomas Hart Benson portrayed scenes of rural America in a manner that appears visually stylized yet reflective of everyday reality. background. Her bent pose is unusual and it is unclear why she has her hands clasped behind her head. Is she injured? Is she trying to take off her dress?

A longtime favorite across Northeast Ohio, William Sommer absorbed ideas from Cubism and other modern European art movements, adapting them to his distinctly Midwestern subject matter of farm scenes, landscapes, and portraits.

In this scene from the Great Depression, a street vendor selling melons, pears, and other fruit contends with a dissatisfied customer.

Honoré Guilbeau had early aspirations as a dancer, but soon after enrolling in classes at the Art Institute of Chicago, she shifted her focus to printmaking. Her thoughts were never far from dancing however, and she often featured dancers and theater scenes in her works.

This painting by French artist Gaston La Touche is an ode to dusk (“crépuscule” in French) and its subtle beauty of color and light.

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Play a Scavenger Hunt (online or in the galleries)

Jimmy Kuehnle: Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle, 2016, Akron Art Museum installation view. Photography by Shane Wynn
Jimmy Kuehnle: Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle, 2016, Akron Art Museum installation view (exterior). Photography by Shane Wynn

Download this scavenger hunt. Explore the collection online or in person to help you match the artworks to the games.

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Art Bingo

Wandering around museum galleries can be relaxing and recharging. But sometimes, you might want to add a level of play. This simple Bingo card invites you to look close and enjoy the surprises. Play with a friend or against a family member. Print this card to bring with you or to use why you explore the online galleries.

MuseumGames are made possible by PNC with additional support from Acme Fresh Market, the Kathy Moses Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Akron Community Foundation, The R.C. Musson and Katharine M. Musson Charitable Foundation, the Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Charles E. and Mabel M. Ritchie Foundation.

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10 Reasons why visiting a museum is what you need to finish 2020 strong

This week, we’ll share some ideas for why exploring art in real life is good for the body and soul: 

  1. Museums are some of the safest social spaces to explore with your family during the pandemic. They are spaces you experience in motion, so you’re not breathing in shared air for long periods of time. Most museums have high quality HVAC, so the air has been treated. Museums are easy to enjoy on your own or in small family groups. When you need a place to be away from home, galleries are there for you.
  2. Spending so much time at home, often with everyone sharing close quarters can be stifling. Visiting a museum can offer a much needed change in perspective in a serene setting. Who doesn’t need a little oasis of serenity these days? 
  3. With social distancing, shared community can be challenging to find. Most museum galleries are expansive enough to allow you to remain in your pod but be around other art lovers. 
  4. Viewing art is a great way to keep your mind sharp. Studies even indicate visiting museums can lower the risk of dementia. 
  5. Discussing art is a powerful way to take a new look at your own challenges when you need a new perspective. 
  6. Museums are perfect for intergenerational conversations. With the art in front of you, the whole family has something to discuss together. 
  7. Museums share works that are historically significant. Visitors, however, can and should have an opinion about the art. Caregivers can use museum visits as a chance to help young ones learn to express their opinion persuasively. 
  8. Social emotional wellness can be challenging in these uncertain times. Discussing and making art are two tools parents and families have to support the social and emotional wellness of their children 
  9. Making art and creative pursuits are known to be a successful strategy for staying calm and relaxed. Seeing other people’s creativity is a tried and true way to get your own muse recharged. 
  10. Being out with your family and friends in a safe space is a chance to have fun outside your home. With so many challenges in life right now, chances to make memories and have positive experiences should be celebrated. 

Many museums have special opportunities to enjoy their galleries at low cost or free. The Akron Art Museum is free through the end of 2020 so our patrons can enjoy these benefits of being in a museum. We’ve even added extra hours, welcoming guests until 8 on Fridays and Saturdays in November and December. Hope the museum is on your list to finish 2020 strong.

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